Tag Archive for Steamboat Springs

CMC art instructor featured in prominent Arkansas exhibit

This article was published in the Steamboat Today. By Teresa Ristow.

Steamboat Springs — Joel S. Allen has spent about 15 years working on a series of hand-wrapped hanging fiber sculptures, an art installation he calls “Hooked on Svelte.”

Steamboat Springs — Joel S. Allen has spent about 15 years working on a series of hand-wrapped hanging fiber sculptures, an art installation he calls “Hooked on Svelte.” Photo: Dustin Bartholomew/courtesy.

Despite his obvious commitment to the project, he was surprised when he was contacted by two men traveling the country in search of exceptional art for a gallery exhibit at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas.

The curatorial duo from the museum drove nearly 100,000 miles across the United States in 2013, meeting nearly 1,000 artists in their hometowns, searching for work that otherwise might go unappreciated on a national level.

The team conducted hundreds of hours of interviews with artists to select those whose work they found the most compelling. Click for full article

Jimmy Westlake: First comet landing

The first successful landing of a space probe onto a comet took place yesterday. CMC physics professor Jimmy Westlake’s column, written the day before Wednesday’s successful landing in the Steamboat Today and reprinted here, gives the back story on this landmark event.

Photo Credit ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM, CC BY-SA IGO 3.0 This mosaic of images reveals the unusual shape and surface of Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target of the European Space Agency’s Rosetta orbiter and Philae lander. Philae made the first controlled landing on a comet’s nucleus Wednesday morning.

Photo: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM, CC BY-SA IGO 3.0
This mosaic of images reveals the unusual shape and surface of Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target of the European Space Agency’s Rosetta orbiter and Philae lander. Philae made the first controlled landing on a comet’s nucleus Wednesday morning.

— If all goes according to plan, a little space probe named Philae will separate from the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft late Tuesday and make the first controlled landing on the surface of a comet Wednesday morning.

It took the Rosetta spacecraft 10 years to chase down and reach Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, or Comet C-G for short. On Aug. 6, it became the first spacecraft in history to orbit a comet nucleus. ESA scientists hope to double-down on Wednesday and make the history books once again with the first-ever comet landing.

Robotic spacecraft have visited several comets over the past few decades, including Halley’s comet, click for full article

CMC professor starts running target club on campus, eyes big future

This article was printed in the Steamboat Today. By Ben Ingersoll.

Colorado Mountain College math professor Alex Krolik has spent decades looking through the scope of expensive air rifles as a running target competitor. The Belarus native is hoping to expand his passion for the sport to campus students and the Steamboat Springs community with a newly launched club.

Colorado Mountain College math professor Alex Krolik has spent decades looking through the scope of expensive air rifles as a running target competitor. The Belarus native is hoping to expand his passion for the sport to campus students and the Steamboat Springs community with a newly launched club. Photo: Ben Ingersoll.

— Colorado Mountain College math professor Alex Krolik longs to bring a different kind of Olympic sport to Steamboat Springs.

It’s no secret that the city has pumped out more Winter Olympians than any other in North America. But Krolik has a deep background in a summer Olympics sport, one that even for the Summer Games isn’t exactly world renown, let alone nationally renown.

A native of Minsk, Belarus, running target air rifle and air pistol shooting has been a staple in Krolik’s life. In most of Europe and Asia, the sport is far from uncommon, and it typically shows during shooting competitions every four summers at the Olympic Games. Click for full article.

16th annual Screamboat Chamber of Horrors is back with a few new surprises

This article was printed in Explore Steamboat. By Audrey Dwyer.

A scary cast of characters will be on hand for this year's Screamboat Chamber of Horror at Colorado Mountain College this Halloween season. The haunted house will open from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday and Oct. 30 and 31. The haunted house is a fundraiser for the college's Sky Club.

A scary cast of characters will be on hand for this year’s Screamboat Chamber of Horror at Colorado Mountain College this Halloween season. The haunted house will open from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday and Oct. 30 and 31. The haunted house is a fundraiser for the college’s Sky Club. Photo: John F. Russell.

— As students and faculty diligently work on preparations for the 16th annual Screamboat Chamber of Horror, they can’t help but think of the emotional roller coaster the brave guests will experience.

“It makes them feel the goosebumps, the hairs standing up on the back of their neck and their heart thumping,” said Jimmy Westlake, Colorado Mountain College astronomy professor. “It makes them feel alive when they are so Read more

Jimmy Westlake: Partial solar eclipse coming Thursday

Jimmy Westlake’s Celestial News column appears Tuesdays in the Steamboat Today. Find more columns by Westlake here.
hursday afternoon, the moon will sideswipe the sun, creating a partial solar eclipse like the one shown in this image taken May 20, 2012. At maximum eclipse at about 4:35 p.m., 55 percent of the sun will be covered up by the moon. Warning: Never look directly at the sun without a proper solar filter, or permanent eye damage can result. The SKY Club at Colorado Mountain College will host a public “Solar Eclipse Watch” with safe solar telescopes set up for public viewing Thursday afternoon on the CMC campus.

hursday afternoon, the moon will sideswipe the sun, creating a partial solar eclipse like the one shown in this image taken May 20, 2012. At maximum eclipse at about 4:35 p.m., 55 percent of the sun will be covered up by the moon. Warning: Never look directly at the sun without a proper solar filter, or permanent eye damage can result. The SKY Club at Colorado Mountain College will host a public “Solar Eclipse Watch” with safe solar telescopes set up for public viewing Thursday afternoon on the CMC campus. Photo Courtesy Jimmy Westlake.

— The shadow of the moon will swoop across almost all of North America on Thursday when the moon crosses paths with the sun

This eclipse will not be total or annular from anywhere on Earth; it’s just a glancing blow by the moon’s shadow, creating a partial solar eclipse. Depending on where you live in Colorado, about 55 percent of the sun will be covered up by the moon.

Read more

Events to showcase local harvest

This article was published in the Steamboat Today. By Audrey Dwyer.

Colorado Mountain College students, from left, Brent Bessey, Maggie Tucci, Kelsie Buccino and Brett Somen Tuesday morning clean potatoes that recently were harvested at the Legacy Ranch. The potatoes will be part of the Yampatika Garden-to-Table dinner at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at Legacy Ranch. Tickets are $75 and include beer and wine.

Colorado Mountain College students, from left, Brent Bessey, Maggie Tucci, Kelsie Buccino and Brett Somen Tuesday morning clean potatoes that recently were harvested at the Legacy Ranch. The potatoes will be part of the Yampatika Garden-to-Table dinner at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at Legacy Ranch. Photo: John F. Russell.

— Planting a seed evokes feelings of anticipation, hopeful expectations and patience while waiting for the first sight of a sprout, Robyn Washburn said.

“That’s why you garden: for that magic that happens when you put a little tiny seed in the ground, and then you can get huge amounts of food just from that,” said Washburn, a student with the sustainability studies program at Colorado Mountain College.

With a bountiful harvest that came from the initial planting in May, Yampatika has partnered with CMC’s sustainability studies and culinary programs for the second annual Garden-to-Table event at Legacy Ranch at Yampatika’s Environmental click for full article

Steamboat Mountain Film Festival kicks off this weekend with TGR film showing

CMC professor Mike Martin is the producer of the Steamboat Mountain Film Festival, Steamboat’s annual showcase of local and national snowsport films. The event kicks off tonight with a showing of Teton Gravity Research’s film “Higher,” featuring Jeremy Jones, at The Sheraton Steamboat Resort. This article was published in the Steamboat Pilot.

ourtesy  Tuck Graham (skier) and Nik Baden (snowboarder) hike a cheese wedge in the gated community while shooting for their new film. Photo was taken by Josh Satterfield.

Tuck Graham (skier) and Nik Baden (snowboarder) hike a cheese wedge in the gated community while shooting for their new film. Photo was taken by Josh Satterfield.

Steamboat Springs — A day of boarding or skiing can come with moments of pure and absolute bliss.

For some, that moment is more than just another day on the mountain. It’s a time to create art.

“If you look at any day riding, it’s unique to be able to capture something on film that you will have forever,” said Mike Martin, a professor at Colorado Mountain College and producer of the Steamboat Mountain Film Festival. “I can think of a lot of experiences ciick for full article

Tom Ross: CMC biology professor witnesses aftermath of rare geothermal event

This article was published in the Steamboat Pilot & Today. By Tom Ross.

ourtesy photo  Colorado Mountain College biology professor Shawn Sigstedt, on sabbatical from the Alpine Campus in Steamboat Springs, poses in front of the rare sight of the Steamboat Geyser venting a roaring column of steam in Yellowstone National Park this week. Sigstedt joined the Geyser Gazers group three years ago.

Colorado Mountain College biology professor Shawn Sigstedt, on sabbatical from the Steamboat Springs campus, poses in front of the rare sight of the Steamboat Geyser venting a roaring column of steam in Yellowstone National Park this week. Courtesy photo.

— Colorado Mountain College biology professor Shawn Sigstedt was thrilled this week to witness the roar of a towering plume of steam issuing from the Steamboat Geyser. But residents of Steamboat Springs needn’t leap up from their desks to rush out and see it. The Steamboat Geyser is in Yellowstone National Park.

“It was emotionally overwhelming because there’s so much power, and the steam can go on for hours and days,” Sigstedt said. “It goes up 1,000 feet, and it sounds like a jet engine. It’s very, very powerful.”

Sigstedt was visiting Yellowstone in the midst of a year-long sabbatical with encouragement from CMC to work on a book about his concept of “World Park.” It’s an effort to protect ecosystems and biodiversity by looking at Earth as one big park. Read more

Colorado-based photographer to exhibit work at CMC-Steamboat

Waterman Counterbalance

“Counterbalance” is one of the abstract photographs from Gayle Waterman that will be on exhibit at Colorado Mountain College in Steamboat Springs Aug. 28-Oct. 28

An exhibit of Basalt, Colo., photographer Gayle Waterman’s abstract work will be on display at Colorado Mountain College in Steamboat Springs beginning Aug. 28.

Through use of color and interpretative design, Waterman’s work shows an affinity for 20th century abstract painters Wassily Kandinsky and Georgia O’Keeffe. Waterman says she has a passion for taking an object, such as an antique, and focusing on one aspect of it, giving the viewer a new way to see the piece in a new context.

Through Oct. 28, Waterman’s abstract photography will be exhibited by CMC ArtShare on the first floor of the college’s academic and student services building in Steamboat Springs. Her work has also been featured in a solo exhibit at Colorado Mountain College’s ArtShare Gallery in Glenwood Springs in 2012.

Colorado Mountain College’s campus in Steamboat Springs is located at 1275 Crawford Ave. The academic and student services building is open to the public Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Friday-Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

More than 250 new students boost enrollment at CMC

This article first appeared in the Steamboat Today. By Teresa Ristow.

Second year Colorado Mountain College student Dylan Spatcher completes work during lunch in the school's recently completed cafeteria. The college has watched enrollment numbers jump since the completion of the new academic building, which includes the cafeteria.

Second year Colorado Mountain College student Dylan Spatcher completes work during lunch in the school’s recently completed cafeteria. The college has watched enrollment numbers jump since the completion of the new academic building, which includes the cafeteria. Photo: John F. Russell.

— Enrollment at Colorado Mountain College in Steamboat Springs is on the rise with increased applicants and more than 250 new students, college administrators announced this week.

Classes began Monday at the Alpine Campus, one of three residential campuses and eight community campuses part of CMC across the state.

Fall applicants are up 30 percent from last year in Steamboat, though it’s too soon to predict how many of those students will follow through with class registrations just yet, said Debbie Crawford, public information officer for Colorado Mountain College’s 11 Read more