Tag Archive for Steamboat Springs

Community Agriculture Alliance: Sustainable agriculture is a year-round endeavor

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CMC Sustainability Studies student Megan Walker wrote about her summer exploration into sustainable agriculture for the Steamboat Pilot’s Community   Agriculture Alliance column, a weekly column written by area farmers, ranchers and policymakers. The column is published on Fridays in the Steamboat Today. Walker’s column is republished below. Read more columns here.

This summer, I embarked on an adventure in sustainable agriculture. Colorado Mountain College’s Sustainability Studies program offered the course for the first time, and while it wasn’t a required course, I am so passionate about the topic that I jumped at the opportunity. Sustainable agriculture is crucial to the success of food sustainability, and I was eager to get my hands dirty.

Grand iCommunity Agriculture Alliance graphicdeas were rolling around in my head, and I quickly learned that these ideas were much larger than the scope of the class.

Simply dabbling in sustainable agriculture is a year-round endeavor.

First and foremost, when planning a garden, soil composition and quality is evaluated so that soil can be prepared in the fall before the snow arrives to ensure a rich, healthy soil capable of nourishing plants the following spring.

A quality garden plan should be developed during the winter months and requires an intimate familiarity of the land and consideration of rotational and companion planting concepts.

Prior planning also allows time to gather seeds and determine the proper timing for when particular seeds will be started indoors or sown in the soil.

Recognizing the limitations of a short summer, there still was much joy to be found in working the gardens at Yampatika’s Environmental Learning Center at Legacy Ranch. Food cultivation using sustainable agricultural practices is possibly one of the most rewarding and empowering experiences we can engage with, and in doing so, we have the opportunity to make a positive impact for ourselves, our neighbors and our environment.

One course assignment was to engage the community in the gardening effort.

A weekly community gardening program was offered. I enjoyed making connections, tending the gardens and watching them grow alongside community members, my family and visitors.

When we visit the ranch, my kids can’t wait to see how the vegetables we planted have grown and are incredibly eager to try them, as well.

Program participants took fresh vegetables, new knowledge and valuable experience home to their own gardens. This program will serve as a building block for future programs, and new volunteer participation always is welcome at the ranch.

We have great expectations for these gardens. We currently are harvesting a first round of produce for our local food bank, LIFT-UP of Routt County.

And next year, we will expand the gardens’ capability with improvements that include a permaculture approach to allow for a greater diversity of products grown.

Last year, a partnership between CMC and Yampatika was created where sustainability students participating in the cultural and place-based equity course worked together with CMC culinary students to deliver a beautiful “Garden to Table” event showcasing food from Yampatika’s gardens and from local producers in the Yampa Valley.

The 2014 “Garden-to-Table” event, an annual fundraiser for Yampatika, will be held Oct. 9, and this year’s collaboration is sure to be another memorable event.

Using lessons learned from our “do it yourself” courses and our experiences in the gardens, we plan to make the gardens even better next year and expand our reach into the community.

The gardens at Legacy Ranch have as much potential as our community has heart, and I hope you will join us for future educational and gardening opportunities in the spring.

Megan Walker is a naturalist with Yampatika and a student in Colorado Mountain College’s Sustainability Studies program.

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Feel the love, Wilderness.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, Steamboat Magazine asked people, “What does wilderness mean to you?” The staff talked with artists,  ranchers, naturalists, land managers, photographers and many Steamboat Magazine contributors featured in the magazine’s pages throughout the years.

CMC professor Tina Evans was one of contributors whose words were featured in the final printed piece published in Steamboat magazine. You can find Tina’s essay on wilderness towards the end of the compilation of voices, reprinted below, that was edited by Jennie Lay and first printed in Steamboat Magazine. “We learned just how much these wild landscapes mean to Yampa Valley folks,” wrote Steamboat Magazine, in their introduction to the piece. There was “a unified reverence for wilderness is palpable; they express their individual passions in the words that follow.”

Gold Lake in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness. Photo by Jim Steinberg

Gold Lake in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness. Photo by Jim Steinberg

Johnny Spillane: Steamboat FlyFisher owner, life-long hunter, four-time Nordic Combined Olympian and three-time silver medalist

My favorite thing to do is get into Wilderness areas with a capital W. When access to an area is limited I always feel my outdoor experience is enhanced. Read more

CMC sustainability studies program featured in Homelink magazine

The cover of HomeLink magazine. CMC sustainability studies student Whitney Chandler recently had two features published in the magazine, which focuses on sustainable building and living.

The cover of HomeLink magazine. CMC sustainability studies student Whitney Chandler recently had two features published in the magazine, which focuses on sustainable building and living.

Whitney Chandler wrote about her experience as a Colorado Mountain College sustainability studies student for the Summer 2014 issue of Homelink magazine. A second article penned by Chandler featured the college’s first annual Sustainability Conference and was published in the same issue.

“Being a part of the program has opened doors for me in ways I never thought possible,” wrote Chandler in her article “In My Green Cape Everyday: My Experience as a CMC Student.”  Click here to read more of Chandler’s words on her student experience. For her sum-up of the sustainability conference, click here.

 

 

 

CMC Ski Team shines with academic honors

CMC athletes earn Phi Theta Kappa and All Academic honors

Students on Colorado Mountain College’s Alpine Ski Team juggle academics with an intense travel schedule. Despite the extra challenge incurred by life on the road, the team managed to earn a cumulative GPA of 3.55 during the spring 2014 semester.

CMC Ski Team Assistant Coach Jaymes Elkins and team members Owen Wattenmaker, Christina Rennie, Will Cutler, and Connor Croasdale. Cutler and Croasdale won All Academic Team and Phi Theta Kappa recognition.

CMC Ski Team Assistant Coach Jaymes Elkins and team members Owen Wattenmaker, Christina Rennie, Will Cutler, and Connor Croasdale. Cutler and Croasdale won All Academic Team and Phi Theta Kappa recognition.

Two students, Will Cutler and Connor Croasdale, also earned All Academic Team and Phi Theta Kappa honors. “The cooperation between students and professors is outstanding,” says Coach Terry Leonard. “Their willingness to work with students that have almost impossible travel schedules is second to none. Without this support and cooperation the team could not accomplish what they do.”

 

Leadership Steamboat Alumni Program to be held May 29

Thursday, May 29, Colorado Mountain College and the Steamboat Springs Chamber Resort Association will host a Leadership Steamboat Alumni luncheon event from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at CMC in Steamboat Springs. The Leadership Steamboat Alumni program is a Steamboat Springs Chamber Resort Association/Colorado Mountain College initiative to provide leadership training and continuing education to Leadership Steamboat program alumni.

Thursday’s event features speakers Steve Muntean and Greg Wooldridge. Muntean, co-founder of the Muntean Leadership and Wooldridge, former Commanding Officer of the U.S. Navy Blue Angels, will address the topic “Creating an Effective Leadership Team,” touching on tools that attendees can  use to improve team performance in their businesses and organizations.

General admission to the event is $40. Tickets are discounted to $30 for Steamboat Chamber Members and $20 for Leadership Steamboat Alumni. Register in advance at www.steamboatchamber.com/LSAlumni.

Colorado Mountain College’s campus location in Steamboat Springs is located at 1275 Crawford Dr, Steamboat Springs. The event takes place in the Fulbright Family Auditorium.

 

Silt resident credits Colorado Mountain College programs for job and career

Three historic educational bills passed by the Johnson administration, which created what are now known as the TRIO programs, are still opening doors for students locally and nationwide. Colorado Mountain College is helping students via TRIO programs at five of its campus locations. Our public information staff recently explored how these programs are changing the lives of students in each of these communities. The article below highlights how CMC’s TRIO program is improving lives of residents in Rifle.

This article was published in the Rifle Citizen Telegram. By Kristin Carlson.

Cheryl Strouse of Silt credits one of several student support programs offered through the federal TRIO program at Colorado Mountain College in Rifle with helping her land a job at the Rifle office of the Garfield County Housing Authority. Photo: Mike McKibbin.

Cheryl Strouse of Silt credits one of several student support programs offered through the federal TRIO program at CMC in Rifle with helping her land a job at the Rifle office of the Garfield County Housing Authority. Photo: Mike McKibbin.

Fifty years after President Lyndon Johnson announced his War on Poverty, at least one front has demonstrated clear victories in improving economic success: higher education.

According to a Pew Research Center study released in February, college-educated workers are less likely to be unemployed and can expect to earn significantly more each year than their peers with high school diplomas alone. As this income gap grows, more than doubling since the passage of Johnson’s anti-poverty bill, higher education has become a critical weapon in the fight for economic opportunity.

Thanks to an Upward Bound grant, Colorado Mountain College in Rifle has helped disadvantaged high school students finish school and succeed in Read more

TRIO programs celebrate five decades of student success

Three historic educational bills passed by the Johnson administration, which created what are now known as the TRIO programs, are still opening doors for students locally and nationwide. Colorado Mountain College is helping students via TRIO programs at five of its campus locations. Our public information staff recently explored how these programs are changing the lives of students in each of these communities; eNews will be running their stories and additional stories from regional media this week. Stay tuned to get inspired! The article below highlights CMC’s TRIO program in Steamboat Springs.

This article was published in the Steamboat Today. By Ben Ingersoll.

Steamboat Springs — The students who walk into the Colorado Mountain College’s Student Success office are, more often than not, looking for help and direction.

TRiO Program Director Laurie Marano has seen them all, from single mothers in their 20s toting two kids to the 50-year-old return student fighting an uphill battle in an aggressively competitive workforce.

Their stories and appearances may vary, but one thing remains a near-constant for every student interested in the TRiO program to help them on their Read more

Life-changing professors at Colorado Mountain College

CMC student Shannon Fatjo will be graduating From Colorado Mountain College in Steamboat Springs in May with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree. Two faculty members at the college had an especially important impact on her educational journey. Shannon wrote about those professors in a Letter to the Editor in the Steamboat Today last week; her letter is reprinted below. 

Dear editor,

As I near the end of my academic career here in Steamboat at Colorado Mountain College, I can’t help but reflect on the experiences I have had, the diversity of the campus within students and staff, the knowledge I have gained and the growth I have experienced.

I have spent the better part of the past six years off and on attending a variety of courses through CMC both online/IVS and on campus. I successfully earned an AAS in 2011, mainly through online/IVS courses, and will be concluding my endeavors this May (May 3 to be exact!) with earning my BSBA. I must say, I have felt the most growth academically, personally and professionally within the past two years, mainly in part due to two professors I have had the privilege and Read more

Wolf Pack Reunion 2014

On March 16, 2014, two hundred alumni from CMC Steamboat Springs returned to campus to remember and celebrate the lives of two classmates, Shawn Pace and Corey Eardley. The group had been tightly knit while they were CMC students, bonded together by the immediate sense of community they felt in Steamboat Springs and their passion for skiing and snowboarding on the mountain. They often rode and skied on the hill together in a large gang they named The Wolf Pack.

Originally envisioned as a small gathering, the reunion grew in numbers immediately once word spread about the potential event. They group created a scholarship in memory of their fallen classmates – The Wolfpack Scholarship Fund – and returned to campus to reconnect, remember their friend, and take some turns together on the mountain once again. CMC sustainability studies student and adjunct faculty Ben Saheb documented this special reunion for the Wolf Pack Alums.

One for the books: Colorado Mountain College student balances skiing, class

This article appeared in the Steamboat Today. By Joel Reichenberger.

Colorado Mountain College student Brett Somen cuts through the trees at Steamboat Ski Area on Sunday, the resort's closing day. Somen skied 119 days at Steamboat and 149 overall, every day but one during the season. He also didn't miss a class and maintained a 3.5 GPA while working on a sustainability bachelor's degree.

Colorado Mountain College student Brett Somen cuts through the trees at Steamboat Ski Area on Sunday, the resort’s closing day. Somen skied 119 days at Steamboat and 149 overall, every day but one during the season. He also didn’t miss a class and maintained a 3.5 GPA while working on a sustainability bachelor’s degree. Photo: Joel Reichenberger.

Steamboat Springs — Brett Somen can’t make it across Gondola Square without seeing five people he knows, and that’s before he even makes it into the gondola building, where the lift operators know him and often greet him by name, as well.

That’s one of the perks of skiing every day, a task Somen, 22, didn’t set out to accomplish this year, and one he, in fact, didn’t accomplish.

He missed a day, one day, after a St. Patrick’s Day celebration that went on a little too long — at least, that’s how it looked in the light of the following Read more