Colorado Mountain College offering bachelor’s degrees in nursing

First two-year college in Colorado to offer BSN degree

rn to bsn

Nursing students at Colorado Mountain College in Breckenridge practice their clinical skills during a lab in the spring of 2014. Working registered nurses can now earn their Bachelor of Science in nursing with a new degree program offered this fall at Colorado Mountain College. Photo Ed Kosmicki

This summer, when Colorado Mountain College made public that its accrediting body had approved a Bachelor of Science in nursing, a number of Colorado nurses’ lives changed.

Instead of wondering when and how they’d ever be able to advance their education, working registered nurses suddenly were given the opportunity to enroll at Colorado Mountain College at a reasonable cost and in a program that allows them to continue to work while living at home. It’s an unprecedented offering in Read more

Tom Ross: CMC biology professor witnesses aftermath of rare geothermal event

This article was published in the Steamboat Pilot & Today. By Tom Ross.

ourtesy photo  Colorado Mountain College biology professor Shawn Sigstedt, on sabbatical from the Alpine Campus in Steamboat Springs, poses in front of the rare sight of the Steamboat Geyser venting a roaring column of steam in Yellowstone National Park this week. Sigstedt joined the Geyser Gazers group three years ago.

Colorado Mountain College biology professor Shawn Sigstedt, on sabbatical from the Steamboat Springs campus, poses in front of the rare sight of the Steamboat Geyser venting a roaring column of steam in Yellowstone National Park this week. Courtesy photo.

— Colorado Mountain College biology professor Shawn Sigstedt was thrilled this week to witness the roar of a towering plume of steam issuing from the Steamboat Geyser. But residents of Steamboat Springs needn’t leap up from their desks to rush out and see it. The Steamboat Geyser is in Yellowstone National Park.

“It was emotionally overwhelming because there’s so much power, and the steam can go on for hours and days,” Sigstedt said. “It goes up 1,000 feet, and it sounds like a jet engine. It’s very, very powerful.”

Sigstedt was visiting Yellowstone in the midst of a year-long sabbatical with encouragement from CMC to work on a book about his concept of “World Park.” It’s an effort to protect ecosystems and biodiversity by looking at Earth as one big park. Read more

Online learning: Past, present and future

This CMC column originally appeared in the Glenwood Post Independent.

Daryl Yarrow is the Colorado Mountain College vice president who oversees distance learning. The number of students taking distance learning classes through the college increased 29 percent compared to the same time last fall.

Daryl Yarrow is the Colorado Mountain College vice president who oversees distance learning. The number of students taking distance learning classes through the college increased 29 percent compared to the same time last fall.

New technologies have changed today’s classroom – at all levels – in ways unimaginable two decades ago. Students can reach for their iPad to access texts or reading material. They can connect with others in another city via video or web conferencing. And what’s more, they can create their own classroom at their home computer, completing courses or entire degrees online.

Maybe you’ve formed an opinion about online classes or degrees. Proponents say they add more options and flexibility. Critics fear students miss out on lively face-to-face debate. Over the years, online learning has changed by leaps and bounds from the days of its predecessor “telecourses” consisting of prerecorded, videotaped lectures and mail-in assignments.

Like most universities and colleges across the country, Colorado Mountain College offers many classes that can be taken online. These include a variety of general education as well as specialty courses. In the past 10 years, the number of online classes offered at CMC has doubled, as has student enrollment in online courses. We now offer six associate degrees and eight certificates completely online.

As you might expect, online learning classes do provide students with more options and flexibility as a course can be completed on the student’s schedule – day or night – allowing adaptation into a busy work or family schedule. Whereas schedules might only permit students to take two or three face-to-face classes in a semester, online learning allows them to possibly take four or five, thus moving them more quickly toward degree completion. Our department’s unofficial motto is: Online learning helps make graduation possible.

What might be the most surprising element of online learning is that it is highly engaging – and may in fact provide more opportunities for engagement than the face-to-face class. Consider the shy student who won’t speak up in class but will open up at the keyboard. Discussion boards provide a venue for teacher-to-student as well as student-to-student interaction. Teachers and students can also easily share timely and relevant information that supplements their discussions by posting links to news articles, streaming video, photos and more.

Online learning classes are equally or even more demanding than their face-to-face counterparts. Students need to have time management and independent study skills. With no set meeting times, students need to take the responsibility of engaging in their course on a regular basis.

Many instructors teaching online learning classes also teach on campus and bring those same qualities of teaching face-to-face to their online learning classrooms. Online learning opens up a greater diversity of course offerings: Within CMC’s dispersed service area, students benefit by having access to a course taught by an instructor at another campus.

Seeing how far online learning has come in the past decade, it will be interesting to see where the next 10 years in learning takes us.

Daryl Yarrow is the associate vice president for online learning at Colorado Mountain College and the interim campus dean of the Roaring Fork Campus, with locations in Carbondale, Glenwood Springs and Glenwood Springs-Spring Valley.

Chevron Summer Science Institute teaches the teachers

CMC expands science education program, nearly doubles enrollment

chevron summer science institute

Teachers at the Chevron Summer Science Institute at Colorado Mountain College in Rifle, June 2014. Photo Ed Kosmicki

While many of their students were enjoying summer break this past June, more than 40 regional elementary and middle school teachers were at Colorado Mountain College in Rifle, learning how to keep those same students engaged and excited about science.

The Chevron Summer Science Institute has nearly doubled in size since it began in the summer of 2013. Last year, funded by Chevron, two dozen K-8 science teachers gathered at Colorado Mountain College for a week to learn how to engage students in science, technology, engineering and math, also known as STEM subjects. They Read more

Colorado-based photographer to exhibit work at CMC-Steamboat

Waterman Counterbalance

“Counterbalance” is one of the abstract photographs from Gayle Waterman that will be on exhibit at Colorado Mountain College in Steamboat Springs Aug. 28-Oct. 28

An exhibit of Basalt, Colo., photographer Gayle Waterman’s abstract work will be on display at Colorado Mountain College in Steamboat Springs beginning Aug. 28.

Through use of color and interpretative design, Waterman’s work shows an affinity for 20th century abstract painters Wassily Kandinsky and Georgia O’Keeffe. Waterman says she has a passion for taking an object, such as an antique, and focusing on one aspect of it, giving the viewer a new way to see the piece in a new context.

Through Oct. 28, Waterman’s abstract photography will be exhibited by CMC ArtShare on the first floor of the college’s academic and student services building in Steamboat Springs. Her work has also been featured in a solo exhibit at Colorado Mountain College’s ArtShare Gallery in Glenwood Springs in 2012.

Colorado Mountain College’s campus in Steamboat Springs is located at 1275 Crawford Ave. The academic and student services building is open to the public Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Friday-Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Sopris Theatre Company at Colorado Mountain College launches new name, season

Sopris Theatre Company at Colorado Mountain College, formerly known as CMC Theatre, is preparing another new season of dramatic fare for audiences up and down the valley.

The season, produced by Jim and Connie Calaway of Carbondale, consists of four productions that will run from Oct. 17, 2014, through April 19, 2015. All performances will take place at the New Space Theatre at Colorado Mountain College in Spring Valley, near Glenwood Springs. One of this season’s productions will also enjoy a run at the Wheeler Opera House in Aspen.

Opening the season is “The Rimers of Eldritch” Oct. 17-19 and Oct. 23-26, a play that focuses on a murder trial in a small Midwestern town. Next, Dec. 4-7 and 11-13 at Spring Valley and Jan. 23-24 in Aspen is the 2007 musical “The Glorious Ones,” which follows a theater troupe’s antics during the Italian Renaissance. “The Women of Lockerbie” runs Feb. 13-15 and 19-22 and tells the true story of the aftermath following the bombing of Pan Am flight 103 in 1988. The season closes with the French farce “A Flea in Her Ear,” a 1907 play set in Paris and full of belle epoque fun, April 10-12 and April 16-19.

Following the season’s offerings, a free student workshop on April 23 is open to the public.

Season tickets are on sale for the four-production series for $60, or $40 for students, seniors and CMC employees. All season ticket holders receive one additional ticket voucher, good for any one of the productions: Bring a friend, or see a show twice.

The Colorado Mountain College campus in Spring Valley is at 3000 County Road 114. Contact 947-8177 or svticketsales@coloradomtn.edu for more information and credit card purchases.

More than 250 new students boost enrollment at CMC

This article first appeared in the Steamboat Today. By Teresa Ristow.

Second year Colorado Mountain College student Dylan Spatcher completes work during lunch in the school's recently completed cafeteria. The college has watched enrollment numbers jump since the completion of the new academic building, which includes the cafeteria.

Second year Colorado Mountain College student Dylan Spatcher completes work during lunch in the school’s recently completed cafeteria. The college has watched enrollment numbers jump since the completion of the new academic building, which includes the cafeteria. Photo: John F. Russell.

— Enrollment at Colorado Mountain College in Steamboat Springs is on the rise with increased applicants and more than 250 new students, college administrators announced this week.

Classes began Monday at the Alpine Campus, one of three residential campuses and eight community campuses part of CMC across the state.

Fall applicants are up 30 percent from last year in Steamboat, though it’s too soon to predict how many of those students will follow through with class registrations just yet, said Debbie Crawford, public information officer for Colorado Mountain College’s 11 Read more

Painter Andrea Kemp comes home to Glenwood

Exhibit at CMC ArtShare Gallery showcases local artist now making impact on Front Range, internationally

unraveled by andrea kemp

Andrea Kemp’s “Unraveled” is one of the paintings in a solo exhibit of the artist’s work at the CMC ArtShare Gallery in downtown Glenwood Springs. Kemp was born and raised in Glenwood and taught at CMC before moving to Golden on the Front Range. An opening reception of her show is on Sept. 5.

The next featured artist at the CMC ArtShare Gallery in downtown Glenwood Springs will be coming from the Front Range to open her new solo show on Sept. 5. But for this figurative painter – Andrea Kemp – Glenwood Springs will feel like home. That’s because it is.

Kemp was born in 1981 in Glenwood, and was raised here as she developed her drawing, sketching and painting skills into her life’s calling.

“At first it wasn’t a thought in my mind that I would be able to make a living in the arts,” Kemp said. “For me, I was so fortunate to have family who not only appreciated the arts but also had artistic backgrounds themselves. On top of that, the community here is close-knit and supportive of the arts and youth. There are Read more

1000 Words

Friday, in Glenwood Springs: Our current president, Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser, with David Delaplane, 87 years young, and the founding father of Colorado Mountain College. Pretty neat.

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Sopris Theatre Company at CMC calls for actors for two productions

Sopris Theatre Company, formerly known as CMC Theatre, will hold open auditions for Lanford Wilson’s “The Rimers of Eldritch” on Sept. 2 from 6 to 9 p.m. By appointment, auditions will take place at Colorado Mountain College in Glenwood Springs-Spring Valley.

In “The Rimers of Eldritch,” a murder trial in a small Missouri hamlet brings to light prejudice, lies and inhumanity – not just on the part of the culprit, but within the souls of all. The cast consists of seven male roles and 10 female roles. Performance dates are Oct. 17-19 and 23-26. The play is directed by Sue Lavin.

Those auditioning for “The Rimers of Eldritch” are asked to prepare a one- to two-minute monologue.

Sept. 6 presents another opportunity to perform in a Sopris Theatre Company production when auditions will be held, also by appointment, for the musical “The Glorious Ones,” from 2 to 5:30 p.m. Callbacks will be Sept. 7, from 2:30 to 5 p.m.

“The Glorious Ones,” with book and lyrics by Lynn Ahrens and music by Stephen Flaherty, follows a theater troupe during the Italian Renaissance both onstage and backstage, and contains rollicking good humor and bawdy fun. Seven male and female actors make up the cast. Performance dates are Dec. 4-7 and 11-13 at Colorado Mountain College in Spring Valley and Jan. 23-24 at the Wheeler Opera House in Aspen. The play is directed by Brad Moore.

Those auditioning for “The Glorious Ones” are asked to prepare one two-minute monologue, and one short vocal performance displaying your range.

Call 947-8177 to make an appointment to audition for either play, or for more information.

Auditions for both performances will be held at the New Space Theatre, Colorado Mountain College in Glenwood Springs-Spring Valley, 3000 County Road 114.