‘Cabin Fever’ author visits Colorado Mountain College campuses for Common Reader tour

Tom Montgomery Fate’s book tour Oct. 20-25

By Carrie Click

Tom Montgomery Fate, author of “Cabin Fever,” will speak at seven Colorado Mountain College campuses this month as part of the eighth annual Common Reader program.

Tom Montgomery Fate, author of “Cabin Fever,” will speak at seven Colorado Mountain College campuses this month as part of the eighth annual Common Reader program.

On the back cover of Tom Montgomery Fate’s memoir, “Cabin Fever,” is a synopsis about this, the author’s fifth nonfiction book. “Try to imagine Thoreau married, with a job, three kids, and a minivan,” it reads.

No matter that Henry David Thoreau, the 19th century author, abolitionist and philosopher, was a lifelong bachelor from a well-to-do family who never had children and certainly never had the opportunity of driving a minivan. Fate’s point instead is that even living in modern times, he still has some elemental needs in common with a man who lived 150 years ago – and so might the rest of us.

“That’s a rather playful rumination,” Fate said about the irreverent description on the back of his book. “I think of Thoreau as amazingly eloquent and extremely disciplined. But he was also decidedly Read more

College hires new general counsel

Richard Gonzales has been hired as the first in-house general counsel for Colorado Mountain College.

Richard Gonzales has been hired as the first in-house general counsel for Colorado Mountain College.

Pueblo native and Denver-based attorney Richard Gonzales has been hired as the new in-house general counsel for Colorado Mountain College.

“We are pleased to offer this position to such an extraordinary, well-qualified candidate and Coloradoan,” said Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser, president and CEO of Colorado Mountain College. “Not only was Richard Gonzales the first university counsel at the University of Denver, his depth and breadth of experience in nonprofit, general business, real estate finance, litigation and contract law will serve the college well. In addition, throughout his distinguished career he has also been a stellar community leader and role model.”

“My career passion is to work for the public interest,” said Gonzales, “and by joining Colorado Mountain College I will be able to do exactly that on a full-time basis. Over the years, my private legal practice and volunteer work have evolved so that I have been working almost exclusively for clients that serve the public. I am excited about working for Read more

Two new campus deans named at Colorado Mountain College

Colorado Mountain College has named Rachel Pokrandt and Linda Crockett as campus deans in, respectively, Rifle and Aspen.

The new deans were selected through an internal search process, in which employees could apply to fill positions that were created following the retirement of two long-time campus vice presidents, Nancy Genova and Joe Maestas.

The campus deans will be the face of the college in the communities they serve, leading their campuses and centers on a day-to-day basis. They will report to a regional vice president, who is currently being recruited through a national search.

In addition, an expanded search will soon be conducted for the dean of the Roaring Fork Campus, a multi-site campus with community locations in Carbondale and Glenwood Springs and a residential campus at Spring Valley near Glenwood Springs. The interim dean of that campus is Daryl Yarrow, who is also the college’s associate vice president of online learning.

Linda Crockett has been named Colorado Mountain College’s campus dean for Aspen. Photo: Beth Zukowski

Linda Crockett has been named Colorado Mountain College’s campus dean for Aspen. Photo: Beth Zukowski

Crockett to serve Aspen campus, community

Crockett first joined Colorado Mountain College in 2006 after a long and accomplished career as the national education director of the Professional Ski Instructors of America and American Association of Snowboard Instructors. At CMC she has been an editor in the public information office, and has also taught as an adjunct instructor at several campuses.

For the past six years she has served as an instructional chair at the Roaring Fork Campus, where she coordinated courses in science, mathematics, outdoor education, and health and fitness. She holds a Master of Science in physical Read more

Earth Science Week Speaker Series at CMC Leadville

Curious to learn more about avalanches, the Yellowstone Caldera (more active than you think!), earthquakes, and the environmental impacts of mining? Catch a CMC Leadville Earth Science Speaker Series event, ongoing all week. For schedule, see poster below. Enjoy the learning!

Poster for CMC Leadville Earth Science Week Speaker Series events

1000 Words: Got College?

Approximately 2,000 high school students attended the Colorado Western Slope College Fair on Oct. 5 in Aspen. Buses, sponsored by CMC, brought students to the fair from 79 rural and mountain communities; some students had to travel for hours and spend the night in Aspen High School’s gym in order to attend.

Representatives from CMC also sat on numerous panels, sharing valuable insights on financial aid, the ASSET bill, support available for first generation students and other options that can help expand access to college for all. Below, CMC President and CEO Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser, with Aspen School District Superintendent John Maloy and Aspen HS Principal Kimberly Martin, shares the day’s key message.

CMC President and CEO Carrie Besnette Hauser at the recent college fair held in Aspen, Colorado

Free shuttle bus runs for CMC students

Colorado Mountain College students and employees can now save money and be greener by catching free rides between college locations in Glenwood Springs, Spring Valley and Carbondale.

RIDE CMC is a free shuttle service operating Monday through Thursday between three local CMC locations and the Thunder River Market on Highway 82 at the Spring Valley turnoff. A CMC student or employee ID is required to ride, or a photo ID plus a class schedule.

“If you have always wanted to take a class at Spring Valley but didn’t have access to a car, this is a great opportunity,” said Lisa Doak, campus dean for student affairs. “We’re glad to be able to provide this additional, free access to students from our communities. This semester an average of 25 students or employees have been using the shuttle every day.”

Stop locations (look for a “RIDE CMC” sign) are in front of the Calaway Academic Building at Spring Valley, on the west side of the Glenwood Center, in front of the Lappala Center in Carbondale and at the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority connection (south end of the parking lot) at Thunder River Market.

RIDE CMC is provided by the college thanks to contributions from the Student Government Association. Fees or charges may apply in future semesters for the shuttle service.

For information, call 947-8200 or go to coloradomtn.edu/ridecmc/.

Community invited to annual veterinary technology facility tour and open house

Colorado Mountain College's veterinary technician center, in summer.

Colorado Mountain College’s veterinary technician center, located at the college’s Spring Valley campus, in summer..

Colorado Mountain College’s Veterinary Technology Club invites the community to tour the program’s 220-acre center and teaching hospital at Spring Valley on Saturday, Oct. 11 from 10 a.m. to noon.

Refreshments and a silent auction will also be available.

The comprehensive tour is free and open to anyone who is interested in veterinary technology or to those individuals and families who just want to visit the facility. High school students who are interested in veterinary medicine are highly encouraged to come.

The center and teaching hospital house a variety of animals including horses, llamas, goats, birds, snakes and more. The tour coincides with Read more

Events to showcase local harvest

This article was published in the Steamboat Today. By Audrey Dwyer.

Colorado Mountain College students, from left, Brent Bessey, Maggie Tucci, Kelsie Buccino and Brett Somen Tuesday morning clean potatoes that recently were harvested at the Legacy Ranch. The potatoes will be part of the Yampatika Garden-to-Table dinner at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at Legacy Ranch. Tickets are $75 and include beer and wine.

Colorado Mountain College students, from left, Brent Bessey, Maggie Tucci, Kelsie Buccino and Brett Somen Tuesday morning clean potatoes that recently were harvested at the Legacy Ranch. The potatoes will be part of the Yampatika Garden-to-Table dinner at 5:30 p.m. Thursday at Legacy Ranch. Photo: John F. Russell.

— Planting a seed evokes feelings of anticipation, hopeful expectations and patience while waiting for the first sight of a sprout, Robyn Washburn said.

“That’s why you garden: for that magic that happens when you put a little tiny seed in the ground, and then you can get huge amounts of food just from that,” said Washburn, a student with the sustainability studies program at Colorado Mountain College.

With a bountiful harvest that came from the initial planting in May, Yampatika has partnered with CMC’s sustainability studies and culinary programs for the second annual Garden-to-Table event at Legacy Ranch at Yampatika’s Environmental click for full article

CMC Partnership Puts Solar Atop Another Library

This article appeared in the Fall 2014 issue of Garfield County Libraries Page by Page publication.

CMC student Eric Black (left) works with Master Electrician Jordan Arnhold (center) and CMC instructor Chris Ellis (right) to install the final row of solar panels atop the Carbondale branch of Garfield County Libraries.

CMC student Eric Black (left) works with Master Electrician Jordan Arnhold (center) and CMC instructor Chris Ellis (right) to install the final row of solar panels atop the Carbondale branch of Garfield County Libraries.

In 2012, the Garfield County Libraries first partnered with Colorado Mountain College (CMC) to put a 10 kilowatt (kW) solar photovoltaic system on the New Castle Branch Library. In 2013, CMC returned to put a 19.6 kW array on the Silt Branch Library. This summer CMC returned yet again to install the biggest solar array to date on the Carbondale Branch Library.

What makes this partnership so unique is the fact that it’s the CMC students and their instructor, Chris Ellis, who are doing the work. Ellis and his eight students in Read more

CMC’s Gianneschi co-authors two groundbreaking reports on education reform

Dr. Matt Gianneschi, chief operating officer and chief of staff at Colorado Mountain College, recently published two groundbreaking reports on the reform of remedial education. Shown here, during the September Town Hall tour of the CMC district, he’s discussing how the college might address this national issue by working even more closely with local school districts. Photo Brent Neumeier

Dr. Matt Gianneschi, chief operating officer and chief of staff at Colorado Mountain College, recently published two groundbreaking reports on the reform of remedial education. Shown here, during the September Town Hall tour of the CMC district, he’s discussing how the college might address this national issue by working even more closely with local school districts. Photo Brent Neumeier

Before Dr. Matt Gianneschi accepted his position in March as chief operating officer and chief of staff at Colorado Mountain College, he needed to finish writing several groundbreaking reports for the Education Commission of the States.

At the time Gianneschi, then vice president of policy and programs for the Denver-based ECS, a national nonprofit that tracks state policy trends and provides research and assistance to state policy leaders throughout the U.S., was in the midst of researching and writing two reports about remedial education policies. The reports address policies needed to inform the public about the number of students who arrive at colleges and universities not ready to enter college-level courses and monitoring their success once enrolled.

According to the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, in 2010 nearly 60 percent of graduating high school seniors entering community colleges were not academically ready for postsecondary coursework. In other words, accurately measuring students’ abilities and success in college is a very significant public Read more