CMC president Hauser hopes to reduce need for remediation

This article first appeared in the Post Independent. By Will Grandbois. 

CMC President Carrie Hauser is holding a series of town hall meetings with faculty and community members at campuses across the district this week. Photo: Will Grandbois / Post Independent.

CMC President Carrie Hauser is holding a series of town hall meetings with faculty and community members at campuses across the district this week. Photo: Will Grandbois / Post Independent.

Eliminating the need for remediation isn’t specifically covered in the goals outlined in CMC’s 2014-2018 “Reaching New Heights” strategic plan, but it has big implications for student and teacher success and the long-term economy of the area.

Projections indicate that nearly three-quarters of Colorado jobs will require a postsecondary education by 2020, but only one in four native high school graduates completes an associate or bachelor’s within six years. Right now, the state benefits from an influx of well-educated newcomers, but it’s not a sustainable long-term model.

“We’ve got to mine our own raw material to bridge the gap of all of those jobs that need to be filled with college educated students,” Hauser said in an interview last week with the Post Independent.

CMC is already doing a great deal to make a secondary education accessible to teens.

The school offers a score of associate programs and as many certificates, Read more

CMC Town Hall on Aspen Public Radio

Report highlights K-12 efforts

Aspen Public Radio reporter Elise Thatcher filed a report from the Colorado Mountain College Town Hall Meeting in Aspen on Tuesday. According to her story:

Colorado Mountain College is turning its focus to what kids are learning before they walk in the door. Right now more than half of incoming students are severely lacking in certain subjects, usually math and English. So now the community college… the largest such network in the state… is working on finding a way to improve what kids are learning in elementary, middle, and high school. It’s part of a larger effort to better serve mountain communities.

Listen to the full story here, or go to Aspen Public Radio.

Aspen Public Radio reporters

The Aspen Public Radio team records the CMC Town Hall meeting with community members at the Aspen Campus on Tuesday.

Reach Your Peak

Reach Your Peak is a partnership between Colorado Mountain College, Colorado Mesa University, Colorado Northwestern Community College, and Western Colorado Community College. Supported by the Northwest Council of El Pomar Foundation, the goal of the program is to create excitement about learning that motivates students toward further education.

Starting with summer camps for middle and high school students, Reach Your Peak continues through concurrent enrollment options for high school students and finally encourages students to pursue college and other postsecondary education. We captured the joy of learning at two Reach Your Peak CMC camps this summer. Enjoy the smiles.

Colorado Mountain College partners with Climax Molybdenum to offer electrician apprenticeship

This article first appeared in the Summit Daily News. By Alli Langley. 

Colorado Mountain College partnered with Freeport MacMoRan, parent corporation of the Climax Molybdenum Co. and Henderson Mill, so the college can provide diagnostic electrician training for company employees in Leadville and Summit County

Colorado Mountain College partnered with Freeport MacMoRan, parent corporation of the Climax Molybdenum Co. and Henderson Mill, so the college can provide diagnostic electrician training for company employees in Leadville and Summit County.

Climax Molybdenum Co. needed help, and Colorado Mountain College came to the company’s aid.

The company found its industrial electrician positions hard to fill and approached Colorado Mountain College about creating a Summit County program where Climax employees could learn the trade.

The college worked with Climax parent company, Freeport-McMoRan, over the last few months to develop the program, and its four apprentices started class at the CMC campus in Dillon on Saturday, Sept. 6.

“This is the first time that we’ve done anything like this,” said Matt Gianneschi, COO for the college, adding that he hopes the agreement will become a model Read more

Colorado Mountain College Sustainability Stories

This summer, Colorado Mountain College started a series of video portraits on students who are making a positive impact in our communities. Our first video features a sustainability studies student who is providing data on on a U.S. Forest Service habitat restoration project near Carbondale, Colorado, filling in a critical resource gap. Meet Jason Evitt, CMC sustainability studies student:

Colorado Mountain College Board of Trustees meets in Leadville

[LEADVILLE] – Colorado Mountain College’s Board of Trustees held its September 2014 meeting Monday at the college’s campus in Leadville, one of CMC’s three residential campuses.

During the meeting the board unanimously voted to approve:

  • Articulation agreements with the Colorado Department of Higher Education, for two dozen associate degrees with specific discipline designations
  • Accepting the preliminary financial report for the first quarter of the current fiscal year
  • Amending the contract for President Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser, changing the date of her first annual performance evaluation to coincide with the end of the college’s fiscal year June 30, 2015
  • Several new college policies in the area of human resources.

The new policies approved by the board included shifting paydays for hourly employees to every other Friday, supporting a drug-free workplace in accordance with recommendations from the state Office of the Attorney General, and phasing out compensatory time while still allowing overtime pay as appropriate.

Trustees approved a recent action from the Partnership for Education (a partnership between the Eagle County School District and Eagle County) to convey acreage in Edwards to Colorado Mountain College, land that has been held by the college in a lease. Trustees voted to approve the relocation of Colorado Mountain College’s instructional site in Salida to 349 E. 9th Street, in the Salida School District’s main administrative building.

In addition, trustees approved that the college president negotiate and execute a contract with Ellucian, which currently provides computer software operating systems to the college, allowing CMC to upgrade mission-critical student information systems at a cost of no more than $750,000 in the current fiscal year and no more than $1.5 million total over three years. Many of the software modules the college currently uses have not been updated in nearly 10 years.

“The software upgrades will provide usability from the student side,” said Dr. Matt Gianneschi, chief operating officer for the college. “They will allow us to modernize all our student-facing technology, including registration and payment. Improving our organizational effectiveness, empowering students to be successful and improving access are three of the goals in our new strategic plan.”

The trustees received a report regarding a partnership between the college and Freeport-McMoRan Inc., parent corporation of the Climax Molybdenum Co. and Henderson Mill, in which Colorado Mountain College is providing diagnostic electrician training for company employees in Leadville and Summit County. The training is delivered in a hybrid format and through use of the college’s mobile technology lab, which is based at the Rifle campus. The courses are funded by Freeport-McMoRan and will qualify employees to be eligible for the highest salary range locally.

The trustees also received preliminary information about some proposed initiatives at the campus in Summit County, including a greenhouse and solar panels.

1000 Words: Community Fair at CMC in Leadville

erik krizman community fair

Colorado Mountain College student Erik Krizman (left) talks with Alice Hoaglund from People’s Bank at the Leadville campus’s Fall Campus & Community Fair Aug. 26, the fall semester’s second day of classes. More than 35 organizations staffed booths as nearly 100 CMC students collected information on everything from banking to ski areas to college clubs. Christie Maier, the coordinator of student activities at the Leadville campus, said the event helps to connect students with resources both on and off campus. In addition to providing community information, the day includes fun activities for the students, including bingo, boxing and tie-dyeing CMC T-shirts. Photo: Brent Neumeier

CMC in Edwards celebrates inaugural student art show

Colorado Mountain College and the Vail Valley Art Guild are presenting an inaugural student art show at CMC in Edwards on Sept. 12 with a free public reception from 5 to 8 p.m. The evening features works by CMC students and faculty, and includes refreshments and music by the Jeremiah Johnson Jazz Quartet.

Colorado Mountain College and the Vail Valley Art Guild are presenting an inaugural student art show at CMC in Edwards on Sept. 12 with a free public reception from 5 to 8 p.m. The evening features works by CMC students and faculty, and includes refreshments and music by the Jeremiah Johnson Jazz Quartet.

On Friday, Sept. 12, the Colorado Mountain College campus in Edwards will come alive with art and music. To celebrate the campus’s inaugural student art show, CMC ArtShare and the recently formed Vail Valley Art Guild will be hosting a free, public opening reception in the auditorium from 5 to 8 p.m.

The evening will feature drinks, appetizers, a renowned jazz quartet and the artwork of more than 30 talented Colorado Mountain College students and faculty. All artwork will be for sale and on view throughout the building during the month following the opening.

The impetus for the show came from a small but dedicated group of students, faculty and community members, excited to showcase the incredible work of local artists and engage the local community, said Roger Sheffield, CEO of the CMC Foundation and the college’s vice president for advancement. From mid-September through mid-October, the campus will be transformed into a Read more

Colorado Mountain College offering bachelor’s degrees in nursing

First two-year college in Colorado to offer BSN degree

rn to bsn

Nursing students at Colorado Mountain College in Breckenridge practice their clinical skills during a lab in the spring of 2014. Working registered nurses can now earn their Bachelor of Science in nursing with a new degree program offered this fall at Colorado Mountain College. Photo Ed Kosmicki

This summer, when Colorado Mountain College made public that its accrediting body had approved a Bachelor of Science in nursing, a number of Colorado nurses’ lives changed.

Instead of wondering when and how they’d ever be able to advance their education, working registered nurses suddenly were given the opportunity to enroll at Colorado Mountain College at a reasonable cost and in a program that allows them to continue to work while living at home. It’s an unprecedented offering in Read more

Tom Ross: CMC biology professor witnesses aftermath of rare geothermal event

This article was published in the Steamboat Pilot & Today. By Tom Ross.

ourtesy photo  Colorado Mountain College biology professor Shawn Sigstedt, on sabbatical from the Alpine Campus in Steamboat Springs, poses in front of the rare sight of the Steamboat Geyser venting a roaring column of steam in Yellowstone National Park this week. Sigstedt joined the Geyser Gazers group three years ago.

Colorado Mountain College biology professor Shawn Sigstedt, on sabbatical from the Steamboat Springs campus, poses in front of the rare sight of the Steamboat Geyser venting a roaring column of steam in Yellowstone National Park this week. Courtesy photo.

— Colorado Mountain College biology professor Shawn Sigstedt was thrilled this week to witness the roar of a towering plume of steam issuing from the Steamboat Geyser. But residents of Steamboat Springs needn’t leap up from their desks to rush out and see it. The Steamboat Geyser is in Yellowstone National Park.

“It was emotionally overwhelming because there’s so much power, and the steam can go on for hours and days,” Sigstedt said. “It goes up 1,000 feet, and it sounds like a jet engine. It’s very, very powerful.”

Sigstedt was visiting Yellowstone in the midst of a year-long sabbatical with encouragement from CMC to work on a book about his concept of “World Park.” It’s an effort to protect ecosystems and biodiversity by looking at Earth as one big park. Read more