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CMC to offer Bachelor of Science in nursing this fall

Information sessions July 15-Aug. 7 at CMC in Breckenridge, Glenwood Springs, Edwards

As of Aug. 25 – the first day of Colorado Mountain College’s fall semester – the college will offer bachelor’s degrees in nursing, for registered nurses.

The new Bachelor of Science in nursing degree, also known as the RN to BSN, will be based at Colorado Mountain College locations in Spring Valley-Glenwood Springs and Breckenridge. However, since the program involves mostly online learning requiring only occasional visits to the college’s campuses, working nurses throughout the CMC service area and beyond may enroll.

RN to BSN functions somewhat differently than a standard four-year bachelor’s degree, as students must have already attained a level of nursing proficiency. Currently, CMC offers a two-year Associate of Applied Science in nursing, which qualifies students to become licensed registered nurses. To enroll in the college’s new bachelor’s program, students must already have earned their associate degree in nursing and hold an RN license in the state of Colorado, in addition Read more

TRIO programs celebrate five decades of student success

Edwards CMC students still benefit from War on Poverty education bill

Earlier this spring, Enews ran a short series of articles profiling students who have benefited from TRIO’s Upward Bound and Student Support Services programs at different Colorado Mountain College locations. This final profile features twins Cindy and Gemma Mendoza and Nereyda Blanco, three students who took part in TRIO programs at Colorado Mountain College in Edwards.

Earlier this spring, Enews ran a short series of articles profiling students who have benefited from TRIO’s Upward Bound and Student Support Services programs at different Colorado Mountain College locations. Our final profile features grad Edgar Montes, the first person in his immediate family earn a college degree. – See more at: http://enews.coloradomtn.edu/?s=TRIO#sthash.ShgyHumv.dpuf
Earlier this spring, Enews ran a short series of articles profiling students who have benefited from TRIO’s Upward Bound and Student Support Services programs at different Colorado Mountain College locations. Our final profile features grad Edgar Montes, the first person in his immediate family earn a college degree. – See more at: http://enews.coloradomtn.edu/?s=TRIO#sthash.ShgyHumv.dpuf
Cindy and Gemma Mendoza

The Mendoza twins from Edwards, Cindy (left) and Gemma (right), celebrated after their graduation from Battle Mountain High School in 2011. Both students, who plan to graduate from the University of Colorado-Boulder in 2015, credit the Upward Bound program for helping them to reach their educational dreams.

Fifty years after President Lyndon Johnson announced his War on Poverty, at least one front has demonstrated clear victories in improving economic success. And that front is higher education.

According to a Pew Research Center study released in February, college-educated workers are less likely to be unemployed and can expect to earn significantly more each year than their peers with high school diplomas alone. As this income gap grows, more than doubling since the passage of Johnson’s anti-poverty bill, higher education has become a critical weapon in the fight for economic opportunity.

Fortunately, three historic educational bills passed by the Johnson administration, which created what are now known as the TRIO programs, are still opening doors for students locally and nationwide. At five of its campuses, Colorado Mountain College is helping students via either TRIO’s Student Support Services or Upward Bound programs.

Thanks to an Upward Bound grant, Colorado Mountain College’s campus in Edwards has been empowering disadvantaged high school students to finish school and succeed in college since 2007. And through Student Support Services grants, starting in 2010, the campus has been able to extend the dream Read more

CMC partners with Glenwood Adventure Park to create info panels

Glenwood Adventure Park Glenwood Canyon sign

Garry Zabel, professor emeritus of geology at Colorado Mountain College stands by one of the educational signs he helped to create for Glenwood Adventure Park. The newly installed panels are a joint project of the college and the park owners, Steve and Jeannie Beckley. Photo Beth Zukowski

The view from the deck at Glenwood Caverns Adventure Park has always been spectacular. Now, guests can learn about the geology of the area while they admire its natural wonders.

A series of geologic panels, commissioned by Glenwood Caverns Adventure Park owners Steve and Jeannie Beckley, were installed at the park’s Lookout Grille deck at the top of the Iron Mountain Tramway earlier this month. Produced in collaboration with Colorado Mountain College, the panels invite viewers to take a closer look at the unique geological features that give the Roaring Fork Valley Read more

Future of education debated at Ideas Festival

Community colleges key to respond to changing demographics, workforce demand

Aspen Ideas Festival Hauser Dirks

At left, CMC President Carrie Besnette Hauser discusses at a July 1 education panel at the Aspen Ideas Festival how colleges can meet changing demographics and workforce needs as fellow panelist Nicholas Dirks, chancellor of the University of California at Berkeley, listens. Photo Seth Andersen

[ASPEN] – Despite dire stories that a college degree is becoming too expensive, a panel of experts in higher education at the Aspen Ideas Festival on July 1 agreed that postsecondary degrees and certificates will be essential to prepare the workforce of the future, even as higher education must adapt to rapidly changing needs of both students and employers.

“The likelihood of being unemployed is four times higher for a high school graduate than someone with a degree,” said Tony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. And although in recent years annual wages have fallen $4-5,000 for the average college graduate, they have dropped even more Read more

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CMC president Carrie Besnette Hauser, Aspen Ideas Festival, 2014, sharing a light moment with University of California Berkeley chancellor Nicholas Dirks during Tuesday’s “Who Is College for, Anymore? The Future of Public Education” session. Stay tuned for an expanded story!

CMC president Carrie Hauser, Aspen Ideas Festival, 2014. Sharing a light moment with University of California Berkeley chancellor Nicholas Dirks during the "Who Is College for, Anymore? The Future of Public Education" session.

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CMC New Media students document Aspen Ideas Fest

Students from Colorado Mountain College’s Isaacson School for New Media have been capturing the action at Aspen Ideas Festival all week. CMC grad and New Media lab guru Seth Anderson captured Curtis Tucker capturing a conversation between Walter Isaacson and Hillary Clinton while testing out the new Microsoft Surface Pro 3. The festival ends tomorrow.

Curtis Tucker captures Walter Isaacson and Hilary Clinton at "The Afternoon of Conversation" with the new MIcrosoft Surface Pro 3 during the 2014 Aspen Ideas Festival.

Curtis Tucker captures Walter Isaacson and Hillary Clinton at “The Afternoon of Conversation” with the new Microsoft Surface Pro 3 during the 2014 Aspen Ideas Festival. Photo: Seth Anderson/Isaacson School for New Media.

Regional: Son of Storm King firefighter reflects on 20th anniversary

This article featuring Andy Tyler, recipient of the CMC Foundation‘s Storm King 14 Memorial Scholarship, first ran in the Glenwood Post Independent. 

uoteWhen Tulane University student Andy Tyler began looking at internship possibilities for the summer before his senior year, it seemed only natural that he would end up in western Colorado, where he was born 21 years ago.

“For a number of reasons it just made sense,” said Tyler, who is studying public health and political science and is now completing his internship at the Mesa County Health Department in Grand Junction.

“I already knew a lot of people out here, including some I hadn’t seen in a long time … and, of course, with the 20th anniversary coming up,” Tyler said of the July 6 anniversary of the tragedy on Storm King Mountain west of Glenwood Springs, where a wildfire in 1994 took the life of 14 wildland firefighters, including Read more

Curry retires from Colorado Mountain College

Dr. Peggy Curry was one of the speakers at the 2013 commencement exercises for Colorado Mountain College’s Edwards Campus. Curry is retiring from the college after 12 years as campus vice president. Photo Pettit Photography

Dr. Peggy Curry was one of the speakers at the 2013 commencement exercises for Colorado Mountain College’s Edwards Campus. Curry is retiring from the college after 12 years as campus vice president. Photo Pettit Photography

[EDWARDS, Colo.] – Dr. Peggy Curry, campus vice president at Colorado Mountain College in Edwards, is retiring after 12 years at the helm of the college’s Eagle County campus.

“We are most grateful for Peggy’s passion in leading the campus through a period of substantial growth,” said Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser, president of the college. “She has been deeply committed to the mission of the college, to student success and to the Vail Valley community.”

Curry said a personal highlight of her years with the college was a recent, historic Partnership for Education meeting in which the members voted unanimously to move forward with deeding the remainder of the Berry Creek parcel to the college and to dissolve the partnership. “This was done in a loving way in recognition of the results achieved through this extraordinary partnership among Eagle Read more

Summer Technology Institute at Colorado Mountain College

Summer Tech Camps

CMC’s Summer Tech Camp is full for middle-schoolers but there’s room for high schoolers. CMC archive photo

Summer tech programs for middle-schoolers sold out; still space in new high school engineering class

What does wading through the Blue River while hunched over holding a waterproof camera have to do with computer technology? Plenty, if you’re Payton Weinman.

Weinman, 13, attended last year’s Summer Technology Institute at Colorado Mountain College in Breckenridge. The Summit Middle School student was one of 15 selected to learn about website development, digital photography, e-commerce shopping carts, Photoshop, video production and editing, and more – all while also getting outside and splashing around in the river, or taking part in Read more