Archive for Uncategorized

1000 Words: Happy Trails

Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 8.37.53 AM

Earth Science Week Speaker Series at CMC Leadville

Curious to learn more about avalanches, the Yellowstone Caldera (more active than you think!), earthquakes, and the environmental impacts of mining? Catch a CMC Leadville Earth Science Speaker Series event, ongoing all week. For schedule, see poster below. Enjoy the learning!

Poster for CMC Leadville Earth Science Week Speaker Series events

Jimmy Westlake: Total lunar eclipse coming next week

This article first appeared in the Steamboat Pilot. By Jimmy Westlake

Steamboat Springs — You have to go back 11 years for the last time that two total lunar eclipses were visible from Colorado in the same calendar year. The second total eclipse of the moon this year happens during the wee morning hours of Oct. 8 when the full Harvest Moon once again slips into the shadow of the Earth.

Jimmy Westlake/courtesy  Last April’s total lunar eclipse was captured in this series of telescopic images, which were taken about an hour apart. A similar total eclipse of the moon will happen Oct. 8 before dawn, the second in a tetrad of total lunar eclipses visible from Colorado in 2014-15.

Last April’s total lunar eclipse was captured in this series of telescopic images, which were taken about an hour apart. A similar total eclipse of the moon will happen Oct. 8 before dawn, the second in a tetrad of total lunar eclipses visible from Colorado in 2014-15. Photo by Jimmy Westlake

The moon’s orbit around the Earth is tipped by about 5 degrees, relative to Earth’s orbit around the sun. This slight misalignment prevents an eclipse of the Moon from happening every time there’s a full moon. There are only two brief windows of time each year, six months apart, when the sun, moon and Earth align just right for an eclipse to occur. These are called our “eclipse seasons.”

The eclipse seasons for 2014 fall in April and October. We had a total eclipse of the moon on April 15, during the previous eclipse season, and here we are, six months later, about to have another one. Each year, the eclipse seasons happen about 18 days earlier. Read more

Steamboat Mountain Film Festival kicks off this weekend with TGR film showing

CMC professor Mike Martin is the producer of the Steamboat Mountain Film Festival, Steamboat’s annual showcase of local and national snowsport films. The event kicks off tonight with a showing of Teton Gravity Research’s film “Higher,” featuring Jeremy Jones, at The Sheraton Steamboat Resort. This article was published in the Steamboat Pilot.

ourtesy  Tuck Graham (skier) and Nik Baden (snowboarder) hike a cheese wedge in the gated community while shooting for their new film. Photo was taken by Josh Satterfield.

Tuck Graham (skier) and Nik Baden (snowboarder) hike a cheese wedge in the gated community while shooting for their new film. Photo was taken by Josh Satterfield.

Steamboat Springs — A day of boarding or skiing can come with moments of pure and absolute bliss.

For some, that moment is more than just another day on the mountain. It’s a time to create art.

“If you look at any day riding, it’s unique to be able to capture something on film that you will have forever,” said Mike Martin, a professor at Colorado Mountain College and producer of the Steamboat Mountain Film Festival. “I can think of a lot of experiences ciick for full article

Walter Isaacson: Where Innovation Comes From

Today’s biggest innovations are coming from the combination of human inspiration and computer-processing power

This article first appeared in the Wall Street Journal – By Walter Isaacson

Mr. Isaacson, chief executive of the Aspen Institute, is the author of biographies of Steve Jobs, Albert Einstein and Benjamin Franklin. His new book, to be published Oct. 7, is “The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution.”

We live in the age of computers, but few of us know who invented them. Because most of the pioneers were part of collaborative teams working in wartime secrecy, they aren’t as famous as an Edison, Bell or Morse. But one genius, the English mathematician Alan Turing, stands out as a heroic-tragic figure, and he’s about to get his due in a new movie, “The Imitation Game,” starring Benedict Cumberbatch, which won the top award at the Toronto Film Festival earlier this month and will open in theaters in November.

The title of the movie refers to a test that Turing thought would someday show that machines could think in ways indistinguishable from humans. His belief in the potential of artificial intelligence stands in contrast to the school of thought that argues that the combined talents of humans and computers, working together as partners, will always be more creative than computers working alone.

Despite occasional breathless headlines, the quest for pure artificial intelligence has so far proven disappointing. But the alternative approach of connecting humans and machines more intimately continues to produce astonishing innovations. As the movie about him shows, Alan Turing’s own deeply human personal life serves as a powerful counter to the idea that there is no fundamental distinction between the human mind and artificial intelligence.

Read the complete story in the Wall Street Journal

Colorado Mountain College moves toward carbon neutrality

Electric vehicle charging stations installed at six locations

CMC's Steamboat campus unveils new electric-car charging station

This electrical vehicle charging station at Colorado Mountain College’s campus in Steamboat Springs – one of six throughout the college’s district on the Western Slope – encourages eco-friendly electric car use. Drivers can plug in for up to two hours at the station in the parking lot.

What’s the quickest route to a carbon-neutral future? That’s the question driving Colorado Mountain College’s employees and sustainability students, who are seeking ways to reduce the college’s energy footprint now and into the years to come.

One answer: by way of the electric vehicle charging stations installed recently at five of the college’s campuses and its central administrative building. The charging stations were a joint project with the Colorado Energy Office, in an effort to reduce fossil fuel emissions Read more

Ernie’s Journey

Video produced by Isaacson School for New Media Students Tells Miraculous Story

In 2014 Colorado Animal Rescue (CARE) received a dog named Ernie who had lost the use of his hind legs. Students from the Isaacson School for New Media found the story interesting and started filming. What happened over those few weeks was quite remarkable!

The video’s producers include: Seth Andersen, Director, Filming, Editor; Kate Lapides, Director, Editor, Filming; Becky Aurora-Thompson, Photography.

The video was screened at CARE’s Dressed to the K9s fashion show on September 14. Over $60,000 was raised at the annual event.

CMC-Spring Valley closed Friday, Sept. 26

Colorado Mountain College’s campus at Spring Valley will be closed for everything except essential services to residential students on Friday, Sept. 26. This is due to a prolonged power outage scheduled by Holy Cross Electric. Beginning at 7 a.m., internet and phone connectivity will not be available on campus. The outage is expected to extend into the afternoon. All Friday classes have either been moved or rescheduled.

The power outage will not affect CMC’s Carbondale or Glenwood centers. Classes and services will continue as normal at those locations.

CMC president Hauser hopes to reduce need for remediation

This article first appeared in the Post Independent. By Will Grandbois. 

CMC President Carrie Hauser is holding a series of town hall meetings with faculty and community members at campuses across the district this week. Photo: Will Grandbois / Post Independent.

CMC President Carrie Hauser is holding a series of town hall meetings with faculty and community members at campuses across the district this week. Photo: Will Grandbois / Post Independent.

Eliminating the need for remediation isn’t specifically covered in the goals outlined in CMC’s 2014-2018 “Reaching New Heights” strategic plan, but it has big implications for student and teacher success and the long-term economy of the area.

Projections indicate that nearly three-quarters of Colorado jobs will require a postsecondary education by 2020, but only one in four native high school graduates completes an associate or bachelor’s within six years. Right now, the state benefits from an influx of well-educated newcomers, but it’s not a sustainable long-term model.

“We’ve got to mine our own raw material to bridge the gap of all of those jobs that need to be filled with college educated students,” Hauser said in an interview last week with the Post Independent.

CMC is already doing a great deal to make a secondary education accessible to teens.

The school offers a score of associate programs and as many certificates, Read more

CMC Town Hall on Aspen Public Radio

Report highlights K-12 efforts

Aspen Public Radio reporter Elise Thatcher filed a report from the Colorado Mountain College Town Hall Meeting in Aspen on Tuesday. According to her story:

Colorado Mountain College is turning its focus to what kids are learning before they walk in the door. Right now more than half of incoming students are severely lacking in certain subjects, usually math and English. So now the community college… the largest such network in the state… is working on finding a way to improve what kids are learning in elementary, middle, and high school. It’s part of a larger effort to better serve mountain communities.

Listen to the full story here, or go to Aspen Public Radio.

Aspen Public Radio reporters

The Aspen Public Radio team records the CMC Town Hall meeting with community members at the Aspen Campus on Tuesday.