Archive for CMC In The News

Dual enrollment saves big dollars for Eagle County students

Four local high school graduates this year piled up enough college credits in dual enrollment classes to earn their associates degree. They are, from left, Maria Villarreal, Reagen Gass, Tiffany Sheehy and Marisol Chacon.

Four local high school graduates this year piled up enough college credits in dual enrollment classes to earn their associates degree. They are, from left, Maria Villarreal, Reagen Gass, Tiffany Sheehy and Marisol Chacon. Photo: Kent Pettit Photography/Special to the Daily.

EAGLE COUNTY — On college tuition checks, the numbers tend to contain more zeroes than your average congressional committee.

As a group, local high school students save almost $1 million a year by taking college classes while still in high school.

They’re called dual enrollment classes and the Eagle County school district ranks eighth among Colorado’s 178 school districts in dual enrollment classes successfully completed, according to the Colorado Department of Education.

Some local students take so many dual enrollment classes through Colorado Mountain College that they graduate high school with an associates degree and transfer into college as juniors. A third of local high school students will take at least one dual enrollment course.

“As we deal with the argument of whether the kids are ready, we can point to about one-third of our kids who already have been taking college classes,” said Mike Gass, the school district’s assistant superintendent. “What’s exciting is Read more

State recognizes Glenwood for downtown improvements

This article was published in the Glenwood Post Independent. By John Stroud.

he various Glenwood Springs downtown projects that have been completed over the past four years, clockwise from top left, the new Glenwood Branch Library, the city's new parking structure, the 711 Grand building renovation and public dining areas, expanded sidewalks along Seventh Street, and the relocation of the Glenwood Chamber Visitors Center to the CMC administration building. At center is an architect's rendering of some of the work that was done.

The various Glenwood Springs downtown projects that have been completed over the past four years, clockwise from top left, the new Glenwood Branch Library, the city’s new parking structure, the 711 Grand building renovation and public dining areas, expanded sidewalks along Seventh Street, and the relocation of the Glenwood Chamber Visitors Center to the CMC administration building. At center is an architect’s rendering of some of the work that was done.

Glenwood Springs has been recognized by the state of Colorado for its four-year, $18 million-plus effort to spruce up its downtown.

Downtown Colorado Inc. on Thursday announced that the Glenwood Downtown Development Authority, the city and four other public entities had won the governor’s “Best Group Effort” Award for Downtown Excellence.

In addition to the Glenwood Springs award, the city of Rifle won “Best Adaptive Reuse or Rehabilitation” for the renovation of the New Ute Events Center (see related story).

Glenwood’s award recognizes the coordinated effort to complete a series of projects that resulted in a new downtown library, improved public parking and Read more

Feel the love, Wilderness.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, Steamboat Magazine asked people, “What does wilderness mean to you?” The staff talked with artists,  ranchers, naturalists, land managers, photographers and many Steamboat Magazine contributors featured in the magazine’s pages throughout the years.

CMC professor Tina Evans was one of contributors whose words were featured in the final printed piece published in Steamboat magazine. You can find Tina’s essay on wilderness towards the end of the compilation of voices, reprinted below, that was edited by Jennie Lay and first printed in Steamboat Magazine. “We learned just how much these wild landscapes mean to Yampa Valley folks,” wrote Steamboat Magazine, in their introduction to the piece. There was “a unified reverence for wilderness is palpable; they express their individual passions in the words that follow.”

Gold Lake in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness. Photo by Jim Steinberg

Gold Lake in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness. Photo by Jim Steinberg

Johnny Spillane: Steamboat FlyFisher owner, life-long hunter, four-time Nordic Combined Olympian and three-time silver medalist

My favorite thing to do is get into Wilderness areas with a capital W. When access to an area is limited I always feel my outdoor experience is enhanced. Read more

Jimmy Westlake: Super moon to stifle meteor shower

CMC professor Jimmy Westlake’s Celestial News column appears Tuesdays in the Steamboat TodayCatch his sum up of this weekend’s full moon, first printed in the Steamboat Today, below. For more columns by Westlake here.

Next weekend’s full moon will be a “super moon,” when the full moon coincides with lunar perigee and the moon will look 7 percent larger than your average full moon. The Perseid meteor shower, which peaks early next week, will be washed out by the bright moonlight. Photo: Jimmy Westlake.

Sunday’s full moon will be a “super moon,” when the full moon coincides with lunar perigee and the moon will look 7 percent larger than your average full moon. The Perseid meteor shower, which peaks early next week, will be washed out by the bright moonlight. Photo: Jimmy Westlake.

— Ordinarily, I would be writing this week to tell you all about the upcoming Perseid meteor shower, arguably our best annual meteor shower.

As luck would have it, the Perseid meteor shower will be washed out by the nearly full moon this year. You might witness a few of the really bright Perseids Read more

What will drive future state economic success?

CMC President Carrie Besnette Hauser and Kelly Brough, president and CEO of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, addressed economic development at a recent Vail Valley Partnership event. A Vail Daily News recap of the event, first published in the Vail Daily, is reprinted below.
CMC President and CEO Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser, left, with Vail Valley Partnership President and CEO Chris Romer, right, participated in the July 22, 2014, Vail Valley Business Forum. Dr. Hauser spoke about how higher education can support changing workforce needs in the valley.

CMC President and CEO Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser, left, with Vail Valley Partnership President and CEO Chris Romer, right, participated in the July 22, 2014, Vail Valley Business Forum. Dr. Hauser spoke about how higher education can support changing workforce needs in the valley.

VAIL — Colorado’s first regional economic initiative was completed before statehood. What comes next?

As the first transcontinental rail line was built in the 1860s, it soon became clear the line would skip Colorado — due mainly to the giant mountains bisecting the state. A group of business leaders in Denver communities to the north banded together to finance a rail line north from Denver to Cheyenne, the closest town to the transcontinental line.

The line was a boon to the mostly-farming communities along the new north-south line. Today, “Denver is Denver, and Cheyenne, is, well, Read more

Tickets on sale now for upcoming Empty Bowls fundraiser in Edwards

CMC Edwards “bowl-a-thon” creates hundreds of bowls for fundraising event.

This article was first printed in the Vail Daily News. By Zachary Johnson.

Willow Murphy makes a bowl at Colorado Mountain College for the upcoming Empty Bowls fundraiser. Photo: Bill Willins. Special to the Daily.

Willow Murphy makes a bowl at Colorado Mountain College for the upcoming Empty Bowls fundraiser. Photo: Bill Willins | Special to the Daily.

EDWARDS — The sixth annual Empty Bowls fundraiser returns to the Vail Valley on Aug. 12. Guests are encouraged to take part in a simple meal of soup, bread and dessert contributed by local restaurants in exchange for a cash donation of $20.

Those who join are provided with a bowl to take home as a reminder of all the empty bowls throughout the United States and the world. The money raised is donated to the Vail Valley Salvation Army Food Pantry in an effort toward ending hunger and food deficiency locally. According to Feeding America, the largest hunger-relief organization in the United States, one out of eight Americans struggle with food inadequacy every Read more

CMC creates strolling history tour in downtown Glenwood

This article was published in the Glenwood Post Independent. By Randy Essex.

Willa Kane talks about the new historical plaques on the CMC building at 8th Street and Grand Avenue.  PHoto: Christopher Mullen/ Post Independent.

Willa Kane talks about the new historical plaques on the CMC building at 8th Street and Grand Avenue. Photo: Christopher Mullen/ Post Independent.

Glenwood Springs has some new history.

It’s downtown, right across the street from where Doc Holliday died, at the heart of Glenwood’s earliest developments — and connected to one of the newest things in town.

Thirteen plaques that outline key moments in Glenwood’s early history were placed last week on the north side of the building Colorado Mountain College shares with U.S. Bank and the Glenwood Springs Chamber Resort Association.

People strolling by can learn about some of the town’s early key figures such as Katie Bender and David Delaplane; its history as a ski destination; where and how it got its first water supply; and how some of the town’s iconic Read more

CMC sustainability studies program featured in Homelink magazine

The cover of HomeLink magazine. CMC sustainability studies student Whitney Chandler recently had two features published in the magazine, which focuses on sustainable building and living.

The cover of HomeLink magazine. CMC sustainability studies student Whitney Chandler recently had two features published in the magazine, which focuses on sustainable building and living.

Whitney Chandler wrote about her experience as a Colorado Mountain College sustainability studies student for the Summer 2014 issue of Homelink magazine. A second article penned by Chandler featured the college’s first annual Sustainability Conference and was published in the same issue.

“Being a part of the program has opened doors for me in ways I never thought possible,” wrote Chandler in her article “In My Green Cape Everyday: My Experience as a CMC Student.”  Click here to read more of Chandler’s words on her student experience. For her sum-up of the sustainability conference, click here.

 

 

 

Regional: Son of Storm King firefighter reflects on 20th anniversary

This article featuring Andy Tyler, recipient of the CMC Foundation‘s Storm King 14 Memorial Scholarship, first ran in the Glenwood Post Independent. 

uoteWhen Tulane University student Andy Tyler began looking at internship possibilities for the summer before his senior year, it seemed only natural that he would end up in western Colorado, where he was born 21 years ago.

“For a number of reasons it just made sense,” said Tyler, who is studying public health and political science and is now completing his internship at the Mesa County Health Department in Grand Junction.

“I already knew a lot of people out here, including some I hadn’t seen in a long time … and, of course, with the 20th anniversary coming up,” Tyler said of the July 6 anniversary of the tragedy on Storm King Mountain west of Glenwood Springs, where a wildfire in 1994 took the life of 14 wildland firefighters, including Read more

Roaring Fork Valley veterans raise funds, inform through acting

CMC Theatre director directs play raising awareness of veterans’ issues

This article first appeared in the Aspen Times.  By Karl Herchenroeder

Michael Lemke, a medically retired Army sergeant who fought during the Iraq invasion, rehearses with fellow veterans in Snowmass on Wednesday. The group performs "Make Sure It's Me," a play about post-9/11 veterans, at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Paecke Auditorium. Photo: Kari Herchenroeder.

Michael Lemke, a medically retired Army sergeant who fought during the Iraq invasion, rehearses with fellow veterans in Snowmass on Wednesday. The group performs “Make Sure It’s Me,” a play about post-9/11 veterans, at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Paepcke Auditorium. Photo: Kari Herchenroeder.

Coming to grips with the loss of cognitive functioning and codependency on family members are a couple of the issues returning veterans with traumatic-brain injuries experience. They are issues happening in living rooms and around kitchen tables all over America.

“And the mass of people are unaware of it,” said Adam McCabe, who joined the U.S. Marines after being motivated by the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

As a way of informing the general public, McCabe and a group of veterans are acting in “Make Sure It’s Me,” a play written in 2009 by Kate Wenner, who interviewed doctors, veterans, wives and mothers dealing with brain injury.

“This is a great vehicle to get a snapshot, a glimpse, an inside view into what a lot of homes look like, what a lot of people are dealing with,” McCabe said.

Directed by Brad Moore, a Colorado Mountain College theater instructor, the play Read more