Archive for CMC In The News

Early childhood degree earns national accreditation

This article was published in the Vail Daily News.

OUR School Director Joy Love, center, works with Bryn Thomas, 3, left, and Nathan Fry, 4, right, at the Glenwood Springs preschool. As have many of OUR School’s staff, Love received her training in early childhood education at Colorado Mountain College. Photo: Kate Lapides.

OUR School Director Joy Love, center, works with Bryn Thomas, 3, left, and Nathan Fry, 4, right, at the Glenwood Springs preschool. As have many of OUR School’s staff, Love received her training in early childhood education at CMC. Photo: Kate Lapides.

Colorado Mountain College’s associate degree in early childhood education has reached a milestone. The degree recently received full national accreditation from the National Association for the Education of Young Children.

“The NAEYC is nationally recognized as the premier leader and advocate in early childhood education in the United States,” said Barbara Jackman, a faculty member in Colorado Mountain College’s early childhood education program. “Full accreditation ensures that our students have chosen a program of high quality to Read more

Breckenridge woman finds fulfillment in foraging

Colorado Mountain College adjunct Erica Marciniec dines on the wild side

The Summit Daily News recently featured CMC adjunct faculty Erica Marciniec and her passion for foraging and wild foods. A reprint of the original Summit Daily News article, by Alli Langley, is below.

CMC adjunct Erica Marciniec

Colorado Mountain College adjunct Erica Marciniec, 39, of Breckenridge.

Walking with Erica Marciniec through the forest is like walking with a friendly pirate carrying a treasure map.

There’s no “X marks the spot.” Instead, the map she teaches you to read is dotted with surprises of wild edibles.

“I gotta show you. We just passed over the most awesome berry in the Rockies,” she said, darting a few feet off trail during a hike near the Mesa Read more

Oil and gas ‘conversation’ covers health, fracking, water

This article first appeared in the Post Independent. By Heidi Rice

Former Garfield County Commissioner Trési Houpt, left, and keynote speaker Dr. Patty Limerick chat during a break at CMC's Community Conversations seminar at the Western Garfield County Campus on Saturday afternoon.

Former Garfield County Commissioner Trési Houpt, left, and keynote speaker Dr. Patty Limerick chat during a break at CMC’s Community Conversations seminar at the Western Garfield County Campus on Saturday afternoon. Photo: Heidi Rice.

RIFLE — Health, fracking and water were the main topics of discussion at Saturday afternoon’s “Community Conversations” event held by Colorado Mountain College at the West Garfield County Campus in Rifle.

The keynote speaker was Dr. Patty Limerick, a faculty director and chair of the board of the Center of the American West at the University Colorado and also a history professor.

Limerick kicked off the free event, which was attended by about 25 people, talking about her philosophy on education, communication and the application of historical perspectives to current issues and how to discuss them in a constructive way.

The seminar was called “Oil and Gas: The Adventures of a Historian in Tense Terrain.” Limerick used her expertise to analyze how people talk about Read more

Community Agriculture Alliance: Sustainable agriculture is a year-round endeavor

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CMC Sustainability Studies student Megan Walker wrote about her summer exploration into sustainable agriculture for the Steamboat Pilot’s Community   Agriculture Alliance column, a weekly column written by area farmers, ranchers and policymakers. The column is published on Fridays in the Steamboat Today. Walker’s column is republished below. Read more columns here.

This summer, I embarked on an adventure in sustainable agriculture. Colorado Mountain College’s Sustainability Studies program offered the course for the first time, and while it wasn’t a required course, I am so passionate about the topic that I jumped at the opportunity. Sustainable agriculture is crucial to the success of food sustainability, and I was eager to get my hands dirty.

Grand iCommunity Agriculture Alliance graphicdeas were rolling around in my head, and I quickly learned that these ideas were much larger than the scope of the class.

Simply dabbling in sustainable agriculture is a year-round endeavor.

First and foremost, when planning a garden, soil composition and quality is evaluated so that soil can be prepared in the fall before the snow arrives to ensure a rich, healthy soil capable of nourishing plants the following spring.

A quality garden plan should be developed during the winter months and requires an intimate familiarity of the land and consideration of rotational and companion planting concepts.

Prior planning also allows time to gather seeds and determine the proper timing for when particular seeds will be started indoors or sown in the soil.

Recognizing the limitations of a short summer, there still was much joy to be found in working the gardens at Yampatika’s Environmental Learning Center at Legacy Ranch. Food cultivation using sustainable agricultural practices is possibly one of the most rewarding and empowering experiences we can engage with, and in doing so, we have the opportunity to make a positive impact for ourselves, our neighbors and our environment.

One course assignment was to engage the community in the gardening effort.

A weekly community gardening program was offered. I enjoyed making connections, tending the gardens and watching them grow alongside community members, my family and visitors.

When we visit the ranch, my kids can’t wait to see how the vegetables we planted have grown and are incredibly eager to try them, as well.

Program participants took fresh vegetables, new knowledge and valuable experience home to their own gardens. This program will serve as a building block for future programs, and new volunteer participation always is welcome at the ranch.

We have great expectations for these gardens. We currently are harvesting a first round of produce for our local food bank, LIFT-UP of Routt County.

And next year, we will expand the gardens’ capability with improvements that include a permaculture approach to allow for a greater diversity of products grown.

Last year, a partnership between CMC and Yampatika was created where sustainability students participating in the cultural and place-based equity course worked together with CMC culinary students to deliver a beautiful “Garden to Table” event showcasing food from Yampatika’s gardens and from local producers in the Yampa Valley.

The 2014 “Garden-to-Table” event, an annual fundraiser for Yampatika, will be held Oct. 9, and this year’s collaboration is sure to be another memorable event.

Using lessons learned from our “do it yourself” courses and our experiences in the gardens, we plan to make the gardens even better next year and expand our reach into the community.

The gardens at Legacy Ranch have as much potential as our community has heart, and I hope you will join us for future educational and gardening opportunities in the spring.

Megan Walker is a naturalist with Yampatika and a student in Colorado Mountain College’s Sustainability Studies program.

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Dual enrollment saves big dollars for Eagle County students

Four local high school graduates this year piled up enough college credits in dual enrollment classes to earn their associates degree. They are, from left, Maria Villarreal, Reagen Gass, Tiffany Sheehy and Marisol Chacon.

Four local high school graduates this year piled up enough college credits in dual enrollment classes to earn their associates degree. They are, from left, Maria Villarreal, Reagen Gass, Tiffany Sheehy and Marisol Chacon. Photo: Kent Pettit Photography/Special to the Daily.

EAGLE COUNTY — On college tuition checks, the numbers tend to contain more zeroes than your average congressional committee.

As a group, local high school students save almost $1 million a year by taking college classes while still in high school.

They’re called dual enrollment classes and the Eagle County school district ranks eighth among Colorado’s 178 school districts in dual enrollment classes successfully completed, according to the Colorado Department of Education.

Some local students take so many dual enrollment classes through Colorado Mountain College that they graduate high school with an associates degree and transfer into college as juniors. A third of local high school students will take at least one dual enrollment course.

“As we deal with the argument of whether the kids are ready, we can point to about one-third of our kids who already have been taking college classes,” said Mike Gass, the school district’s assistant superintendent. “What’s exciting is Read more

State recognizes Glenwood for downtown improvements

This article was published in the Glenwood Post Independent. By John Stroud.

he various Glenwood Springs downtown projects that have been completed over the past four years, clockwise from top left, the new Glenwood Branch Library, the city's new parking structure, the 711 Grand building renovation and public dining areas, expanded sidewalks along Seventh Street, and the relocation of the Glenwood Chamber Visitors Center to the CMC administration building. At center is an architect's rendering of some of the work that was done.

The various Glenwood Springs downtown projects that have been completed over the past four years, clockwise from top left, the new Glenwood Branch Library, the city’s new parking structure, the 711 Grand building renovation and public dining areas, expanded sidewalks along Seventh Street, and the relocation of the Glenwood Chamber Visitors Center to the CMC administration building. At center is an architect’s rendering of some of the work that was done.

Glenwood Springs has been recognized by the state of Colorado for its four-year, $18 million-plus effort to spruce up its downtown.

Downtown Colorado Inc. on Thursday announced that the Glenwood Downtown Development Authority, the city and four other public entities had won the governor’s “Best Group Effort” Award for Downtown Excellence.

In addition to the Glenwood Springs award, the city of Rifle won “Best Adaptive Reuse or Rehabilitation” for the renovation of the New Ute Events Center (see related story).

Glenwood’s award recognizes the coordinated effort to complete a series of projects that resulted in a new downtown library, improved public parking and Read more

Feel the love, Wilderness.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, Steamboat Magazine asked people, “What does wilderness mean to you?” The staff talked with artists,  ranchers, naturalists, land managers, photographers and many Steamboat Magazine contributors featured in the magazine’s pages throughout the years.

CMC professor Tina Evans was one of contributors whose words were featured in the final printed piece published in Steamboat magazine. You can find Tina’s essay on wilderness towards the end of the compilation of voices, reprinted below, that was edited by Jennie Lay and first printed in Steamboat Magazine. “We learned just how much these wild landscapes mean to Yampa Valley folks,” wrote Steamboat Magazine, in their introduction to the piece. There was “a unified reverence for wilderness is palpable; they express their individual passions in the words that follow.”

Gold Lake in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness. Photo by Jim Steinberg

Gold Lake in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness. Photo by Jim Steinberg

Johnny Spillane: Steamboat FlyFisher owner, life-long hunter, four-time Nordic Combined Olympian and three-time silver medalist

My favorite thing to do is get into Wilderness areas with a capital W. When access to an area is limited I always feel my outdoor experience is enhanced. Read more

Jimmy Westlake: Super moon to stifle meteor shower

CMC professor Jimmy Westlake’s Celestial News column appears Tuesdays in the Steamboat TodayCatch his sum up of this weekend’s full moon, first printed in the Steamboat Today, below. For more columns by Westlake here.

Next weekend’s full moon will be a “super moon,” when the full moon coincides with lunar perigee and the moon will look 7 percent larger than your average full moon. The Perseid meteor shower, which peaks early next week, will be washed out by the bright moonlight. Photo: Jimmy Westlake.

Sunday’s full moon will be a “super moon,” when the full moon coincides with lunar perigee and the moon will look 7 percent larger than your average full moon. The Perseid meteor shower, which peaks early next week, will be washed out by the bright moonlight. Photo: Jimmy Westlake.

— Ordinarily, I would be writing this week to tell you all about the upcoming Perseid meteor shower, arguably our best annual meteor shower.

As luck would have it, the Perseid meteor shower will be washed out by the nearly full moon this year. You might witness a few of the really bright Perseids Read more

What will drive future state economic success?

CMC President Carrie Besnette Hauser and Kelly Brough, president and CEO of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, addressed economic development at a recent Vail Valley Partnership event. A Vail Daily News recap of the event, first published in the Vail Daily, is reprinted below.
CMC President and CEO Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser, left, with Vail Valley Partnership President and CEO Chris Romer, right, participated in the July 22, 2014, Vail Valley Business Forum. Dr. Hauser spoke about how higher education can support changing workforce needs in the valley.

CMC President and CEO Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser, left, with Vail Valley Partnership President and CEO Chris Romer, right, participated in the July 22, 2014, Vail Valley Business Forum. Dr. Hauser spoke about how higher education can support changing workforce needs in the valley.

VAIL — Colorado’s first regional economic initiative was completed before statehood. What comes next?

As the first transcontinental rail line was built in the 1860s, it soon became clear the line would skip Colorado — due mainly to the giant mountains bisecting the state. A group of business leaders in Denver communities to the north banded together to finance a rail line north from Denver to Cheyenne, the closest town to the transcontinental line.

The line was a boon to the mostly-farming communities along the new north-south line. Today, “Denver is Denver, and Cheyenne, is, well, Read more

Tickets on sale now for upcoming Empty Bowls fundraiser in Edwards

CMC Edwards “bowl-a-thon” creates hundreds of bowls for fundraising event.

This article was first printed in the Vail Daily News. By Zachary Johnson.

Willow Murphy makes a bowl at Colorado Mountain College for the upcoming Empty Bowls fundraiser. Photo: Bill Willins. Special to the Daily.

Willow Murphy makes a bowl at Colorado Mountain College for the upcoming Empty Bowls fundraiser. Photo: Bill Willins | Special to the Daily.

EDWARDS — The sixth annual Empty Bowls fundraiser returns to the Vail Valley on Aug. 12. Guests are encouraged to take part in a simple meal of soup, bread and dessert contributed by local restaurants in exchange for a cash donation of $20.

Those who join are provided with a bowl to take home as a reminder of all the empty bowls throughout the United States and the world. The money raised is donated to the Vail Valley Salvation Army Food Pantry in an effort toward ending hunger and food deficiency locally. According to Feeding America, the largest hunger-relief organization in the United States, one out of eight Americans struggle with food inadequacy every Read more