Archive for CMC In The News

CMC art instructor featured in prominent Arkansas exhibit

This article was published in the Steamboat Today. By Teresa Ristow.

Steamboat Springs — Joel S. Allen has spent about 15 years working on a series of hand-wrapped hanging fiber sculptures, an art installation he calls “Hooked on Svelte.”

Steamboat Springs — Joel S. Allen has spent about 15 years working on a series of hand-wrapped hanging fiber sculptures, an art installation he calls “Hooked on Svelte.” Photo: Dustin Bartholomew/courtesy.

Despite his obvious commitment to the project, he was surprised when he was contacted by two men traveling the country in search of exceptional art for a gallery exhibit at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas.

The curatorial duo from the museum drove nearly 100,000 miles across the United States in 2013, meeting nearly 1,000 artists in their hometowns, searching for work that otherwise might go unappreciated on a national level.

The team conducted hundreds of hours of interviews with artists to select those whose work they found the most compelling. Click for full article

United Way of Eagle River Valley announces CMC graduate as new executive director

Alumna Rebecca Kanaly was a top graduate of the inaugural class of the bachelor’s in business administration program at Colorado Mountain College. First published in the Vail Daily.

VAIL — The board of the United Way of Eagle River Valley has appointed Rebecca Kanaly as executive director, replacing Karen Lechner, effective Dec. 1. As executive director, Kanaly is tasked with expanding United Way’s leadership presence, reach and impact in our community by providing increased opportunities to, and by working strategically with, local nonprofits who are demonstrating excellence in service.

Kanaly has lived in Vail since 2006 after leaving a career in Denver with an award-winning custom home builder. She has co-founded several organizations in Colorado and served on the executive boards of Cancer League of Colorado, Eagle Valley Senior Life and Helmet Heads. Additionally, she has provided consulting to Wapiyapi Cancer Camps and, as a Daniel’s Consulting firm project manager to the city and county of Denver. A top graduate of the inaugural class of the Bachelor of Science in business administration degree program at Read more

Jimmy Westlake: First comet landing

The first successful landing of a space probe onto a comet took place yesterday. CMC physics professor Jimmy Westlake’s column, written the day before Wednesday’s successful landing in the Steamboat Today and reprinted here, gives the back story on this landmark event.

Photo Credit ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM, CC BY-SA IGO 3.0 This mosaic of images reveals the unusual shape and surface of Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target of the European Space Agency’s Rosetta orbiter and Philae lander. Philae made the first controlled landing on a comet’s nucleus Wednesday morning.

Photo: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM, CC BY-SA IGO 3.0
This mosaic of images reveals the unusual shape and surface of Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target of the European Space Agency’s Rosetta orbiter and Philae lander. Philae made the first controlled landing on a comet’s nucleus Wednesday morning.

— If all goes according to plan, a little space probe named Philae will separate from the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft late Tuesday and make the first controlled landing on the surface of a comet Wednesday morning.

It took the Rosetta spacecraft 10 years to chase down and reach Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, or Comet C-G for short. On Aug. 6, it became the first spacecraft in history to orbit a comet nucleus. ESA scientists hope to double-down on Wednesday and make the history books once again with the first-ever comet landing.

Robotic spacecraft have visited several comets over the past few decades, including Halley’s comet, click for full article

CMC professor starts running target club on campus, eyes big future

This article was printed in the Steamboat Today. By Ben Ingersoll.

Colorado Mountain College math professor Alex Krolik has spent decades looking through the scope of expensive air rifles as a running target competitor. The Belarus native is hoping to expand his passion for the sport to campus students and the Steamboat Springs community with a newly launched club.

Colorado Mountain College math professor Alex Krolik has spent decades looking through the scope of expensive air rifles as a running target competitor. The Belarus native is hoping to expand his passion for the sport to campus students and the Steamboat Springs community with a newly launched club. Photo: Ben Ingersoll.

— Colorado Mountain College math professor Alex Krolik longs to bring a different kind of Olympic sport to Steamboat Springs.

It’s no secret that the city has pumped out more Winter Olympians than any other in North America. But Krolik has a deep background in a summer Olympics sport, one that even for the Summer Games isn’t exactly world renown, let alone nationally renown.

A native of Minsk, Belarus, running target air rifle and air pistol shooting has been a staple in Krolik’s life. In most of Europe and Asia, the sport is far from uncommon, and it typically shows during shooting competitions every four summers at the Olympic Games. Click for full article.

Vail Daily column: Education is an economic driver

Dr. Jason Glass, superintendent of Eagle County Schools; Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser, president and CEO of Colorado Mountain College; and Chris Romer president and CEO of Vail Valley Partnership, co-authored this editorial, first published in the Vail Daily.

A healthy and diverse economy pays almost innumerable benefits to a community. A few of these positive outcomes include wealth generation, job growth, economic stability, civic and cultural vitality, the creation of a stable tax base for essential public services, a better quality of life, etc. A healthy economy provides a springboard for families in our community to reach their dreams.

The link between the economy and education is critical and inseparable. While the beginnings of the American education system were premised on creating participant citizens for our fledgling republic, in reality it was the economic need Read more

What It Takes to Keep a Community Theater Running

The Wall Street Journal recently published an article on the diverse, innovative approaches community theaters around the country are utilizing to stay afloat. The long running Aspen Community Theatre and Colorado Mountain College theatre program faculty Brad Moore were featured in the article by Kevin Brass.

Aspen Community Theater puts on one show in the fall, like this production of “My Fair Lady.” Stuart Huck

Aspen Community Theater puts on one show in the fall, like this production of “My Fair Lady.” Photo: Stuart Huck

All the world may be a stage, but theater is a tough way to make a buck.

Lots of people dream of starting a local theater. It’s a way to get into show business on their own terms or share their passion for live performance with their neighbors—and perhaps make some money doing what they love.

But raising the curtain can be much more of a challenge than they imagined. Typically, they end up having to scrimp, save and beg to stay afloat. They survive on ingenuity—cobbling together public and private funding, low-cost attention-getting stunts and strong local support. Click for full article

16th annual Screamboat Chamber of Horrors is back with a few new surprises

This article was printed in Explore Steamboat. By Audrey Dwyer.

A scary cast of characters will be on hand for this year's Screamboat Chamber of Horror at Colorado Mountain College this Halloween season. The haunted house will open from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday and Oct. 30 and 31. The haunted house is a fundraiser for the college's Sky Club.

A scary cast of characters will be on hand for this year’s Screamboat Chamber of Horror at Colorado Mountain College this Halloween season. The haunted house will open from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday and Oct. 30 and 31. The haunted house is a fundraiser for the college’s Sky Club. Photo: John F. Russell.

— As students and faculty diligently work on preparations for the 16th annual Screamboat Chamber of Horror, they can’t help but think of the emotional roller coaster the brave guests will experience.

“It makes them feel the goosebumps, the hairs standing up on the back of their neck and their heart thumping,” said Jimmy Westlake, Colorado Mountain College astronomy professor. “It makes them feel alive when they are so Read more

Best of the Boat: Jimmy Westlake voted best professor

CMC outdoor education professor John Saunders takes runner-up honors

This article was printed in the Steamboat Today. By Teresa Ristrow.

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Colorado Mountain College professor Jimmy Westlake lectures a class of students. Westlake was voted “Best Professor” in the Steamboat Today’s “Best of the Boat” contest. CMC professor John Saunders was voted runner-up. Photo: John F. Russell.

It’s not hard to find out why Colorado Mountain College Professor Jimmy Westlake is considered a star among the community — not a shooting one, but a shining one.

The diehard astronomy professor, who moved to Steamboat in 1998 from Georgia and is now in his 17th year teaching at CMC, is also the advisor for the college’s Sky Club and organizer of the annual Screamboat haunted house. He says it’s his strong connection with his students, whom he holds to high standards, that has earned him such praise from his pupils.

“I hold the bar really high, and I expect a lot,” Westlake says. “But I help them get over that bar, and I think they like a class that’s challenging.” Click for full article

Wall Street Journal consults Isaacson School teacher

New headset makes virtual reality mobile

Wall Street Journal Video recently reviewed Altergaze, a 3D-printed headset which connects to smartphones, giving users a virtual reality experience from their mobile device. For the review, WSJ Video sought the expertise of Steve Kaufman, an instructor at Colorado Mountain College’s Isaacson School for New Media. Kaufman is involved in cutting edge technology projects in the Roaring Fork Valley and is an investor in Altergaze. Here’s the review:

Eagle and Pitkin counties host open house events for veterans

Eagle County Veteran’s Services Officers Pat Hammon and Tyson Ivie will host two open houses in October to allow veterans and their families to meet them and receive information regarding veterans’ services and benefits.

The first open house will take place from 3 to 7 p.m. Oct. 29 in room 258 at Colorado Mountain College in Edwards. The second will be co-hosted by Joe Carpenter, veteran’s services officer for Garfield and Pitkin counties, from 3 to 7 p.m. Oct. 30 in the Mt. Sopris Room of the Eagle County Community Center, located at 0020 Eagle County Drive in El Jebel.

During both events, representatives from Eagle and Pitkin County Department of Human Services and other community organizations will be available to answer questions. Bob Herrera, State Veterans Service Officer for the Colorado Department of Military & Veterans Affairs, will conduct a formal presentation on veterans’ benefits at 3:30 p.m. and again at 5:30 p.m. during both open houses. Information concerning veterans’ education, vocational rehab and VA medical care will also be available.

In their roles, Hammon, Ivie and Carpenter assist veterans and their families with information regarding veterans’ rights and benefits, as well as with submitting claims for benefits and securing necessary documents for completing claims.

For more information, contact Hammon at 970-390-4686 or Carpenter at 970-625-9484.