Get Cosmic for the holidays

Cover of CMC Professor Jimmy Westlake's 2015 astrophotography calenderCMC professor Jimmy Westlake’s Cosmic Calenders are back for 2015! The theme of the 2015 Cosmic Calendar is “Fire and Ice” and features twelve celestial images from Westlake’s travels in Hawaii, Alaska, and across the United States. Westlake’s full-color,  8.5”x11”, heavy card stock glossy finish calenders are full of  information about cool celestial events that will be taking place in the coming year, including meteor showers, eclipses, and more.

Five dollars from the sale of each calendar goes directly to the CMC Sky Club, the CMC Steamboat Student Astronomy Club. You can order your calender by emailing Jimmy Westlake directly with your order at  jwestlake@coloradomtn.edu.  Alternately, visit professor Westlake’s website at shop.jwestlake.com. Prices for calenders are listed below. Happy skywatching!
Special CMC Pricing:
1 calendar is $18
2 to 5 calendars are $17 each

6 to 9 calendars are $16 each

10 or more calendars are $15 each


Startup Weekend Western Colorado to turn ideas into business ventures

[Glenwood Springs, CO] – The weekend of Nov. 21-23, entrepreneurs and creative minds are invited to Colorado Mountain College’s Glenwood Center for Startup Weekend Western Colorado. This event will provide not only inspiration, but the resources required for building and launching a viable, scalable company.

During the weekend, participants share ideas, form teams around top vote-getting ideas, get advice and hear talks from successful entrepreneurs. They can learn needed skills, build prototype products and take the first steps in launching startup businesses.

Startup Weekend at CMC in Glenwood Springs will join more than 1,800 Startup events around the world in 2014 alone. Glenwood’s event coincides with Global Entrepreneurship Week, Nov. 17-23, which celebrates business innovators and job creators. As part of that celebration, Glenwood’s Startup Weekend will take part in the Global Startup Battle, a worldwide competition involving Startup teams from more than 100 countries. Glenwood’s winning team will be in line to Read more

Innovators in education: Tennessee – and CMC

This column first appeared in the Nov. 5, 2014 Glenwood Springs Post Independent. By Herb Feinzig

I was recently invited to attend the New York Times’ Schools for Tomorrow program, where some 250 individuals from the public and private sectors (including government) came together to discuss the future of American higher education. It was an opportunity to learn about the latest innovations and how we could apply those at Colorado Mountain College. I was exposed to new ideas, but I was also pleasantly surprised to learn that CMC has many of the same plans as some of the country’s most forward-thinking educators.

One of the most impressive speakers was Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, who spoke about a program his state has implemented called “the Tennessee Promise.” This program gives every high school senior who graduates two tuition-free years of attendance at either a community college or technical/trade school. The program also has community volunteers acting as mentors to students in those first two years. I also heard that students needing any remediation will take that remediation during their senior year in high school, rather than in college. This program has many similarities to programs already Read more

CMC art instructor featured in prominent Arkansas exhibit

This article was published in the Steamboat Today. By Teresa Ristow.

Steamboat Springs — Joel S. Allen has spent about 15 years working on a series of hand-wrapped hanging fiber sculptures, an art installation he calls “Hooked on Svelte.”

Steamboat Springs — Joel S. Allen has spent about 15 years working on a series of hand-wrapped hanging fiber sculptures, an art installation he calls “Hooked on Svelte.” Photo: Dustin Bartholomew/courtesy.

Despite his obvious commitment to the project, he was surprised when he was contacted by two men traveling the country in search of exceptional art for a gallery exhibit at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas.

The curatorial duo from the museum drove nearly 100,000 miles across the United States in 2013, meeting nearly 1,000 artists in their hometowns, searching for work that otherwise might go unappreciated on a national level.

The team conducted hundreds of hours of interviews with artists to select those whose work they found the most compelling. Click for full article

Colorado Mountain College landscape painting exhibit comes ‘Close to Home’

 Five renowned artists are your neighbors

 By Carrie Click

“Boneyard,” by Andy Taylor, is one of the landscapes that will be on display in the exhibit “Close to Home” at Colorado Mountain College in Rifle through Jan. 10.

“Boneyard,” by Andy Taylor, is one of the landscapes that will be on display in the exhibit “Close to Home” at Colorado Mountain College in Rifle through Jan. 10.

Usually, it goes something like this: You arrive at an art exhibit and look around. If it’s a landscape show, you admire the talent and perspective of the painters, but you don’t recognize the scenes depicted. They depict a far-off beach or city, or maybe a historical event long since passed.

That’s not what happens at “Close to Home,” an exhibit that is hanging in the main hallway of Colorado Mountain College’s campus in Rifle through Jan. 10. The show features the works of five well-respected, collected local artists, four of whom live so close to the campus they could almost walk there from their studios. And the fifth artist, Andy Taylor, only lives as far away as Carbondale.

Artists flocking to Silt?

“The Grand Hogback,” by Dan Young, is one of the landscapes that will be on display in the exhibit “Close to Home” at Colorado Mountain College in Rifle through Jan. 10.

“The Grand Hogback,” by Dan Young, is one of the landscapes that will be on display in the exhibit “Close to Home” at Colorado Mountain College in Rifle through Jan. 10.

Rolling through the town of Silt, it might not immediately be apparent that the community is such a magnet for artists. But it’s where painters Dean Bowlby, Dan Young, Jane Lee and Lanny Grant live and work.

For Bowlby and Young, who attended Glenwood Springs High School together, a move down valley with room to breathe and to paint brought them to the town.

“It wasn’t intentional,” said Young of landing in Silt. “After I grew up in Glenwood, I wanted to get out of here Read more

The Whole Works launches Kickstarter campaign

The Whole Works, a project partnering with GarCo Sewing Works sponsored in part by CMC is a Rifle-based sewing manufacturing facility.

The Whole Works, a project partnering with GarCo Sewing Works sponsored in part by CMC is a Rifle-based sewing manufacturing facility.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, between 1990 and 2011 the U.S. lost 750,000 apparel manufacturing jobs. A new company based in Rifle is attempting to get some of those jobs back.

The Whole Works is a new sewing facility that provides skilled sewers to designers of softgoods and clothing. Besides training people to sew and creating jobs, the company recruits sewers from GarCo Sewing Works, a design training center and entrepreneurial learning lab in Rifle operated by Colorado Mountain College in partnership with Garfield County.

In November, The Whole Works founders Kelly Alford, Sadye Harvey, Julia Marshall and Janie Rich launched a fundraising campaign on the crowdsourcing site, Kickstarter, with a goal of raising $35,000 to cover sewing machines and supplies and facility improvements. As of Nov. 17, more than 95 donors had pledged more than $15,500. The Whole Works has until Nov. 29 to raise the remaining funds in order to receive any of the pledged money.

To learn more about the Kickstarter campaign, go to https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1560932422/thewholeworks. For more information about Colorado Mountain College’s GarCo Sewing Works, go to garcosewingworks.com.

 

 

 

 

United Way of Eagle River Valley announces CMC graduate as new executive director

Alumna Rebecca Kanaly was a top graduate of the inaugural class of the bachelor’s in business administration program at Colorado Mountain College. First published in the Vail Daily.

VAIL — The board of the United Way of Eagle River Valley has appointed Rebecca Kanaly as executive director, replacing Karen Lechner, effective Dec. 1. As executive director, Kanaly is tasked with expanding United Way’s leadership presence, reach and impact in our community by providing increased opportunities to, and by working strategically with, local nonprofits who are demonstrating excellence in service.

Kanaly has lived in Vail since 2006 after leaving a career in Denver with an award-winning custom home builder. She has co-founded several organizations in Colorado and served on the executive boards of Cancer League of Colorado, Eagle Valley Senior Life and Helmet Heads. Additionally, she has provided consulting to Wapiyapi Cancer Camps and, as a Daniel’s Consulting firm project manager to the city and county of Denver. A top graduate of the inaugural class of the Bachelor of Science in business administration degree program at Read more

1000 Words: Snow

It’s here!

snow

Less talk, more action

The Colorado Climate Summit moves past the conversation about climate change and toward solving the problem

The following article on the Colorado Climate Summit was published in the Boulder Weekly. CMC Rifle instructor Chris Ellis, who teaches in the college’s solar energy program, is featured at the end of the article. Ellis shares his thoughts on the importance of creating energy literacy in kids. By Caitlin Rockett.

Illustration for Colorafo Climate SummitRobert Castellino has worn a lot of hats over the last 20 years — he ran the ski-racing program at Eldora in the early ’80s, worked in telecommunications, founded his own greeting card company, supported adolescents as a youth minister and, as a lifelong photographer, has authored five photographic story and guide books about Boulder, Denver and Colorado at large.

Now he’s donned another hat — environmental activist.

“I’ve always had a passion for the environment and the books I’ve written in the past … have always had a component about the ecology of commerce and our place in relationship to nature in Colorado,” Castellino says. “Nature has always driven my experience in Colorado and everything I know click for full article

Jimmy Westlake: First comet landing

The first successful landing of a space probe onto a comet took place yesterday. CMC physics professor Jimmy Westlake’s column, written the day before Wednesday’s successful landing in the Steamboat Today and reprinted here, gives the back story on this landmark event.

Photo Credit ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM, CC BY-SA IGO 3.0 This mosaic of images reveals the unusual shape and surface of Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target of the European Space Agency’s Rosetta orbiter and Philae lander. Philae made the first controlled landing on a comet’s nucleus Wednesday morning.

Photo: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM, CC BY-SA IGO 3.0
This mosaic of images reveals the unusual shape and surface of Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the target of the European Space Agency’s Rosetta orbiter and Philae lander. Philae made the first controlled landing on a comet’s nucleus Wednesday morning.

— If all goes according to plan, a little space probe named Philae will separate from the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft late Tuesday and make the first controlled landing on the surface of a comet Wednesday morning.

It took the Rosetta spacecraft 10 years to chase down and reach Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, or Comet C-G for short. On Aug. 6, it became the first spacecraft in history to orbit a comet nucleus. ESA scientists hope to double-down on Wednesday and make the history books once again with the first-ever comet landing.

Robotic spacecraft have visited several comets over the past few decades, including Halley’s comet, click for full article