Colorado Mountain College partners with Climax Molybdenum to offer electrician apprenticeship

This article first appeared in the Summit Daily News. By Alli Langley. 

Colorado Mountain College partnered with Freeport MacMoRan, parent corporation of the Climax Molybdenum Co. and Henderson Mill, so the college can provide diagnostic electrician training for company employees in Leadville and Summit County

Colorado Mountain College partnered with Freeport MacMoRan, parent corporation of the Climax Molybdenum Co. and Henderson Mill, so the college can provide diagnostic electrician training for company employees in Leadville and Summit County.

Climax Molybdenum Co. needed help, and Colorado Mountain College came to the company’s aid.

The company found its industrial electrician positions hard to fill and approached Colorado Mountain College about creating a Summit County program where Climax employees could learn the trade.

The college worked with Climax parent company, Freeport-McMoRan, over the last few months to develop the program, and its four apprentices started class at the CMC campus in Dillon on Saturday, Sept. 6.

“This is the first time that we’ve done anything like this,” said Matt Gianneschi, COO for the college, adding that he hopes the agreement will become a model Read more

Colorado Mountain College Sustainability Stories

This summer, Colorado Mountain College started a series of video portraits on students who are making a positive impact in our communities. Our first video features a sustainability studies student who is providing data on on a U.S. Forest Service habitat restoration project near Carbondale, Colorado, filling in a critical resource gap. Meet Jason Evitt, CMC sustainability studies student:

Colorado Mountain College Board of Trustees meets in Leadville

[LEADVILLE] – Colorado Mountain College’s Board of Trustees held its September 2014 meeting Monday at the college’s campus in Leadville, one of CMC’s three residential campuses.

During the meeting the board unanimously voted to approve:

  • Articulation agreements with the Colorado Department of Higher Education, for two dozen associate degrees with specific discipline designations
  • Accepting the preliminary financial report for the first quarter of the current fiscal year
  • Amending the contract for President Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser, changing the date of her first annual performance evaluation to coincide with the end of the college’s fiscal year June 30, 2015
  • Several new college policies in the area of human resources.

The new policies approved by the board included shifting paydays for hourly employees to every other Friday, supporting a drug-free workplace in accordance with recommendations from the state Office of the Attorney General, and phasing out compensatory time while still allowing overtime pay as appropriate.

Trustees approved a recent action from the Partnership for Education (a partnership between the Eagle County School District and Eagle County) to convey acreage in Edwards to Colorado Mountain College, land that has been held by the college in a lease. Trustees voted to approve the relocation of Colorado Mountain College’s instructional site in Salida to 349 E. 9th Street, in the Salida School District’s main administrative building.

In addition, trustees approved that the college president negotiate and execute a contract with Ellucian, which currently provides computer software operating systems to the college, allowing CMC to upgrade mission-critical student information systems at a cost of no more than $750,000 in the current fiscal year and no more than $1.5 million total over three years. Many of the software modules the college currently uses have not been updated in nearly 10 years.

“The software upgrades will provide usability from the student side,” said Dr. Matt Gianneschi, chief operating officer for the college. “They will allow us to modernize all our student-facing technology, including registration and payment. Improving our organizational effectiveness, empowering students to be successful and improving access are three of the goals in our new strategic plan.”

The trustees received a report regarding a partnership between the college and Freeport-McMoRan Inc., parent corporation of the Climax Molybdenum Co. and Henderson Mill, in which Colorado Mountain College is providing diagnostic electrician training for company employees in Leadville and Summit County. The training is delivered in a hybrid format and through use of the college’s mobile technology lab, which is based at the Rifle campus. The courses are funded by Freeport-McMoRan and will qualify employees to be eligible for the highest salary range locally.

The trustees also received preliminary information about some proposed initiatives at the campus in Summit County, including a greenhouse and solar panels.

1000 Words: Community Fair at CMC in Leadville

erik krizman community fair

Colorado Mountain College student Erik Krizman (left) talks with Alice Hoaglund from People’s Bank at the Leadville campus’s Fall Campus & Community Fair Aug. 26, the fall semester’s second day of classes. More than 35 organizations staffed booths as nearly 100 CMC students collected information on everything from banking to ski areas to college clubs. Christie Maier, the coordinator of student activities at the Leadville campus, said the event helps to connect students with resources both on and off campus. In addition to providing community information, the day includes fun activities for the students, including bingo, boxing and tie-dyeing CMC T-shirts. Photo: Brent Neumeier

CMC in Edwards celebrates inaugural student art show

Colorado Mountain College and the Vail Valley Art Guild are presenting an inaugural student art show at CMC in Edwards on Sept. 12 with a free public reception from 5 to 8 p.m. The evening features works by CMC students and faculty, and includes refreshments and music by the Jeremiah Johnson Jazz Quartet.

Colorado Mountain College and the Vail Valley Art Guild are presenting an inaugural student art show at CMC in Edwards on Sept. 12 with a free public reception from 5 to 8 p.m. The evening features works by CMC students and faculty, and includes refreshments and music by the Jeremiah Johnson Jazz Quartet.

On Friday, Sept. 12, the Colorado Mountain College campus in Edwards will come alive with art and music. To celebrate the campus’s inaugural student art show, CMC ArtShare and the recently formed Vail Valley Art Guild will be hosting a free, public opening reception in the auditorium from 5 to 8 p.m.

The evening will feature drinks, appetizers, a renowned jazz quartet and the artwork of more than 30 talented Colorado Mountain College students and faculty. All artwork will be for sale and on view throughout the building during the month following the opening.

The impetus for the show came from a small but dedicated group of students, faculty and community members, excited to showcase the incredible work of local artists and engage the local community, said Roger Sheffield, CEO of the CMC Foundation and the college’s vice president for advancement. From mid-September through mid-October, the campus will be transformed into a Read more

Colorado Mountain College offering bachelor’s degrees in nursing

First two-year college in Colorado to offer BSN degree

rn to bsn

Nursing students at Colorado Mountain College in Breckenridge practice their clinical skills during a lab in the spring of 2014. Working registered nurses can now earn their Bachelor of Science in nursing with a new degree program offered this fall at Colorado Mountain College. Photo Ed Kosmicki

This summer, when Colorado Mountain College made public that its accrediting body had approved a Bachelor of Science in nursing, a number of Colorado nurses’ lives changed.

Instead of wondering when and how they’d ever be able to advance their education, working registered nurses suddenly were given the opportunity to enroll at Colorado Mountain College at a reasonable cost and in a program that allows them to continue to work while living at home. It’s an unprecedented offering in Read more

Tom Ross: CMC biology professor witnesses aftermath of rare geothermal event

This article was published in the Steamboat Pilot & Today. By Tom Ross.

ourtesy photo  Colorado Mountain College biology professor Shawn Sigstedt, on sabbatical from the Alpine Campus in Steamboat Springs, poses in front of the rare sight of the Steamboat Geyser venting a roaring column of steam in Yellowstone National Park this week. Sigstedt joined the Geyser Gazers group three years ago.

Colorado Mountain College biology professor Shawn Sigstedt, on sabbatical from the Steamboat Springs campus, poses in front of the rare sight of the Steamboat Geyser venting a roaring column of steam in Yellowstone National Park this week. Courtesy photo.

— Colorado Mountain College biology professor Shawn Sigstedt was thrilled this week to witness the roar of a towering plume of steam issuing from the Steamboat Geyser. But residents of Steamboat Springs needn’t leap up from their desks to rush out and see it. The Steamboat Geyser is in Yellowstone National Park.

“It was emotionally overwhelming because there’s so much power, and the steam can go on for hours and days,” Sigstedt said. “It goes up 1,000 feet, and it sounds like a jet engine. It’s very, very powerful.”

Sigstedt was visiting Yellowstone in the midst of a year-long sabbatical with encouragement from CMC to work on a book about his concept of “World Park.” It’s an effort to protect ecosystems and biodiversity by looking at Earth as one big park. Read more

Online learning: Past, present and future

This CMC column originally appeared in the Glenwood Post Independent.

Daryl Yarrow is the Colorado Mountain College vice president who oversees distance learning. The number of students taking distance learning classes through the college increased 29 percent compared to the same time last fall.

Daryl Yarrow is the Colorado Mountain College vice president who oversees distance learning. The number of students taking distance learning classes through the college increased 29 percent compared to the same time last fall.

New technologies have changed today’s classroom – at all levels – in ways unimaginable two decades ago. Students can reach for their iPad to access texts or reading material. They can connect with others in another city via video or web conferencing. And what’s more, they can create their own classroom at their home computer, completing courses or entire degrees online.

Maybe you’ve formed an opinion about online classes or degrees. Proponents say they add more options and flexibility. Critics fear students miss out on lively face-to-face debate. Over the years, online learning has changed by leaps and bounds from the days of its predecessor “telecourses” consisting of prerecorded, videotaped lectures and mail-in assignments.

Like most universities and colleges across the country, Colorado Mountain College offers many classes that can be taken online. These include a variety of general education as well as specialty courses. In the past 10 years, the number of online classes offered at CMC has doubled, as has student enrollment in online courses. We now offer six associate degrees and eight certificates completely online.

As you might expect, online learning classes do provide students with more options and flexibility as a course can be completed on the student’s schedule – day or night – allowing adaptation into a busy work or family schedule. Whereas schedules might only permit students to take two or three face-to-face classes in a semester, online learning allows them to possibly take four or five, thus moving them more quickly toward degree completion. Our department’s unofficial motto is: Online learning helps make graduation possible.

What might be the most surprising element of online learning is that it is highly engaging – and may in fact provide more opportunities for engagement than the face-to-face class. Consider the shy student who won’t speak up in class but will open up at the keyboard. Discussion boards provide a venue for teacher-to-student as well as student-to-student interaction. Teachers and students can also easily share timely and relevant information that supplements their discussions by posting links to news articles, streaming video, photos and more.

Online learning classes are equally or even more demanding than their face-to-face counterparts. Students need to have time management and independent study skills. With no set meeting times, students need to take the responsibility of engaging in their course on a regular basis.

Many instructors teaching online learning classes also teach on campus and bring those same qualities of teaching face-to-face to their online learning classrooms. Online learning opens up a greater diversity of course offerings: Within CMC’s dispersed service area, students benefit by having access to a course taught by an instructor at another campus.

Seeing how far online learning has come in the past decade, it will be interesting to see where the next 10 years in learning takes us.

Daryl Yarrow is the associate vice president for online learning at Colorado Mountain College and the interim campus dean of the Roaring Fork Campus, with locations in Carbondale, Glenwood Springs and Glenwood Springs-Spring Valley.

Chevron Summer Science Institute teaches the teachers

CMC expands science education program, nearly doubles enrollment

chevron summer science institute

Teachers at the Chevron Summer Science Institute at Colorado Mountain College in Rifle, June 2014. Photo Ed Kosmicki

While many of their students were enjoying summer break this past June, more than 40 regional elementary and middle school teachers were at Colorado Mountain College in Rifle, learning how to keep those same students engaged and excited about science.

The Chevron Summer Science Institute has nearly doubled in size since it began in the summer of 2013. Last year, funded by Chevron, two dozen K-8 science teachers gathered at Colorado Mountain College for a week to learn how to engage students in science, technology, engineering and math, also known as STEM subjects. They Read more

Colorado-based photographer to exhibit work at CMC-Steamboat

Waterman Counterbalance

“Counterbalance” is one of the abstract photographs from Gayle Waterman that will be on exhibit at Colorado Mountain College in Steamboat Springs Aug. 28-Oct. 28

An exhibit of Basalt, Colo., photographer Gayle Waterman’s abstract work will be on display at Colorado Mountain College in Steamboat Springs beginning Aug. 28.

Through use of color and interpretative design, Waterman’s work shows an affinity for 20th century abstract painters Wassily Kandinsky and Georgia O’Keeffe. Waterman says she has a passion for taking an object, such as an antique, and focusing on one aspect of it, giving the viewer a new way to see the piece in a new context.

Through Oct. 28, Waterman’s abstract photography will be exhibited by CMC ArtShare on the first floor of the college’s academic and student services building in Steamboat Springs. Her work has also been featured in a solo exhibit at Colorado Mountain College’s ArtShare Gallery in Glenwood Springs in 2012.

Colorado Mountain College’s campus in Steamboat Springs is located at 1275 Crawford Ave. The academic and student services building is open to the public Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Friday-Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.