1000 Words

Friday, in Glenwood Springs: Our current president, Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser, with David Delaplane, 87 years young, and the founding father of Colorado Mountain College. Pretty neat.

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Sopris Theatre Company at CMC calls for actors for two productions

Sopris Theatre Company, formerly known as CMC Theatre, will hold open auditions for Lanford Wilson’s “The Rimers of Eldritch” on Sept. 2 from 6 to 9 p.m. By appointment, auditions will take place at Colorado Mountain College in Glenwood Springs-Spring Valley.

In “The Rimers of Eldritch,” a murder trial in a small Missouri hamlet brings to light prejudice, lies and inhumanity – not just on the part of the culprit, but within the souls of all. The cast consists of seven male roles and 10 female roles. Performance dates are Oct. 17-19 and 23-26. The play is directed by Sue Lavin.

Those auditioning for “The Rimers of Eldritch” are asked to prepare a one- to two-minute monologue.

Sept. 6 presents another opportunity to perform in a Sopris Theatre Company production when auditions will be held, also by appointment, for the musical “The Glorious Ones,” from 2 to 5:30 p.m. Callbacks will be Sept. 7, from 2:30 to 5 p.m.

“The Glorious Ones,” with book and lyrics by Lynn Ahrens and music by Stephen Flaherty, follows a theater troupe during the Italian Renaissance both onstage and backstage, and contains rollicking good humor and bawdy fun. Seven male and female actors make up the cast. Performance dates are Dec. 4-7 and 11-13 at Colorado Mountain College in Spring Valley and Jan. 23-24 at the Wheeler Opera House in Aspen. The play is directed by Brad Moore.

Those auditioning for “The Glorious Ones” are asked to prepare one two-minute monologue, and one short vocal performance displaying your range.

Call 947-8177 to make an appointment to audition for either play, or for more information.

Auditions for both performances will be held at the New Space Theatre, Colorado Mountain College in Glenwood Springs-Spring Valley, 3000 County Road 114.

Early childhood degree earns national accreditation

This article was published in the Vail Daily News.

OUR School Director Joy Love, center, works with Bryn Thomas, 3, left, and Nathan Fry, 4, right, at the Glenwood Springs preschool. As have many of OUR School’s staff, Love received her training in early childhood education at Colorado Mountain College. Photo: Kate Lapides.

OUR School Director Joy Love, center, works with Bryn Thomas, 3, left, and Nathan Fry, 4, right, at the Glenwood Springs preschool. As have many of OUR School’s staff, Love received her training in early childhood education at CMC. Photo: Kate Lapides.

Colorado Mountain College’s associate degree in early childhood education has reached a milestone. The degree recently received full national accreditation from the National Association for the Education of Young Children.

“The NAEYC is nationally recognized as the premier leader and advocate in early childhood education in the United States,” said Barbara Jackman, a faculty member in Colorado Mountain College’s early childhood education program. “Full accreditation ensures that our students have chosen a program of high quality to Read more

Breckenridge woman finds fulfillment in foraging

Colorado Mountain College adjunct Erica Marciniec dines on the wild side

The Summit Daily News recently featured CMC adjunct faculty Erica Marciniec and her passion for foraging and wild foods. A reprint of the original Summit Daily News article, by Alli Langley, is below.

CMC adjunct Erica Marciniec

Colorado Mountain College adjunct Erica Marciniec, 39, of Breckenridge.

Walking with Erica Marciniec through the forest is like walking with a friendly pirate carrying a treasure map.

There’s no “X marks the spot.” Instead, the map she teaches you to read is dotted with surprises of wild edibles.

“I gotta show you. We just passed over the most awesome berry in the Rockies,” she said, darting a few feet off trail during a hike near the Mesa Read more

Maestas, Genova retire from Colorado Mountain College

 

While they waited for commencement exercises to begin this past May, Nancy Genova, Colorado Mountain College campus vice president in Rifle, spoke with students such as GED recipients Claudia Carrasco, left, and Jacobed Carrasco. Genova is retiring from the college after 27 years. Photo Charles Engelbert

While they waited for commencement exercises to begin this past May, Nancy Genova, Colorado Mountain College campus vice president in Rifle, spoke with students such as GED recipients Claudia Carrasco, left, and Jacobed Carrasco. Genova is retiring from the college after 27 years. Photo Charles Engelbert

Both campus vice presidents are retiring this month; between them, they oversee all five CMC learning locations from Aspen to Rifle, also including Carbondale, Spring Valley and Glenwood Springs.

“It’s been an honor to work with Nancy, who’s been a compassionate leader in guiding her campus, our students in Garfield County and her peers within the college through nearly 30 years of learning,” said Dr. Carrie Besnette Hauser, president of the college.

“And Joe has played a key role in simultaneously leading two campuses over several years. I am grateful for his calm perseverance and flexibility in managing our campuses from Aspen to Glenwood Springs,” Hauser said. “We will miss their strong leadership and advocacy on behalf of their students and their communities.”

Joe Maestas, Colorado Mountain College’s campus vice president in Aspen, and interim vice president at the Roaring Fork Campus, welcomed graduates, family and friends to May’s commencement in Spring Valley. Maestas is retiring from the college after 20 years. Photo Ian Edquist

Joe Maestas, Colorado Mountain College’s campus vice president in Aspen, and interim vice president at the Roaring Fork Campus, welcomed graduates, family and friends to May’s commencement in Spring Valley. Maestas is retiring from the college after 20 years. Photo Ian Edquist

Maestas, who is retiring this month as the college’s campus vice president in Aspen and interim campus vice president for the Roaring Fork Campus in Carbondale, Glenwood Springs and Spring Valley, started as an adjunct instructor teaching psychology and career development. In his 20 years at CMC he has also been Aspen campus dean, student services counselor and instructional supervisor.

Genova’s first job at the college was as the director of student services for the Roaring Fork Campus. For many years she was Roaring Fork Campus dean, moving several years ago to the college’s campus in Rifle, where she was campus dean, and then vice president. Most recently in her 27-year tenure, she has also overseen collegewide sustainability initiatives, which last spring earned Read more

Tribute to Cuhatlique Cardenas

VEV-Cuhatlique Cardenas_smThe Colorado Mountain College family, and the Edwards campus in particular, lost a special person and remarkable student last week when Cuhatlique Cardenas passed away following an automobile accident. She had been awarded the Alpine Bank Latino/Hispanic Scholarship in 2009, and was studying in the sustainable cuisine program.

We are deeply saddened to learn about the passing of such a promising young woman. Our thoughts go out to her family, friends and classmates. “Quat” was a graduate of Battle Mountain High School, and in high school knew that she wanted to eventually own and operate her own restaurant. In addition to working 20 hours a week at a restaurant in Avon even back then, she also managed to intern for The Youth Foundation in Eagle County.

“Cuhatlique was one of the kindest, gentlest souls I have ever met,” said Student Support Services coordinator Heather O’Malley, who knew Cuhatlique through SSS. “She will be greatly missed.”

“It was always a pleasure to have Cuhatlique walk into my classroom with her infectious smile and easy laugh,” said Todd Rymer, director of the sustainable cuisine program. “She was one of the hardest-working students in the school, as is evidenced by the beautiful garden she planted and nurtured.”

“Cuhatlique was a joyful young lady, full of life and dreams,” said Yesenia Arreola, youth outreach coordinator, who said it was an honor to be her scholarship mentor. “She worked hard to help provide for her household and to achieve her educational goals. I close my eyes and I can hear her laugh, see her smile. It hurts to know she is no longer here.”

The Edwards campus invites students and employees to gather in her memory on Tuesday, Aug. 26, on the back patio. Todd Rymer and Heather O’Malley will say a few words, and friends will also be invited to share their memories. We will then observe a moment of silence. Counselors will be on hand and available to talk with anyone who needs support.

Memorial for Cuhatlique Cardenas

Tuesday, Aug. 26 at noon

Back patio, near the fire pit

In addition, there will be a viewing of her body on Wednesday, Aug. 27, from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. at St. Patrick’s Church in Minturn. A rosary will follow at 6 p.m. On Thursday, Aug. 28, at 10 a.m. there will be a mass at the same location. The family is accepting donations to help with Cuhatlique’s funeral. Individuals can deposit money at Academy Bank under the name of Rosa Maria Cardenas (Cuhatlique’s mother).

 

Oil and gas ‘conversation’ covers health, fracking, water

This article first appeared in the Post Independent. By Heidi Rice

Former Garfield County Commissioner Trési Houpt, left, and keynote speaker Dr. Patty Limerick chat during a break at CMC's Community Conversations seminar at the Western Garfield County Campus on Saturday afternoon.

Former Garfield County Commissioner Trési Houpt, left, and keynote speaker Dr. Patty Limerick chat during a break at CMC’s Community Conversations seminar at the Western Garfield County Campus on Saturday afternoon. Photo: Heidi Rice.

RIFLE — Health, fracking and water were the main topics of discussion at Saturday afternoon’s “Community Conversations” event held by Colorado Mountain College at the West Garfield County Campus in Rifle.

The keynote speaker was Dr. Patty Limerick, a faculty director and chair of the board of the Center of the American West at the University Colorado and also a history professor.

Limerick kicked off the free event, which was attended by about 25 people, talking about her philosophy on education, communication and the application of historical perspectives to current issues and how to discuss them in a constructive way.

The seminar was called “Oil and Gas: The Adventures of a Historian in Tense Terrain.” Limerick used her expertise to analyze how people talk about Read more

Community Agriculture Alliance: Sustainable agriculture is a year-round endeavor

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CMC Sustainability Studies student Megan Walker wrote about her summer exploration into sustainable agriculture for the Steamboat Pilot’s Community   Agriculture Alliance column, a weekly column written by area farmers, ranchers and policymakers. The column is published on Fridays in the Steamboat Today. Walker’s column is republished below. Read more columns here.

This summer, I embarked on an adventure in sustainable agriculture. Colorado Mountain College’s Sustainability Studies program offered the course for the first time, and while it wasn’t a required course, I am so passionate about the topic that I jumped at the opportunity. Sustainable agriculture is crucial to the success of food sustainability, and I was eager to get my hands dirty.

Grand iCommunity Agriculture Alliance graphicdeas were rolling around in my head, and I quickly learned that these ideas were much larger than the scope of the class.

Simply dabbling in sustainable agriculture is a year-round endeavor.

First and foremost, when planning a garden, soil composition and quality is evaluated so that soil can be prepared in the fall before the snow arrives to ensure a rich, healthy soil capable of nourishing plants the following spring.

A quality garden plan should be developed during the winter months and requires an intimate familiarity of the land and consideration of rotational and companion planting concepts.

Prior planning also allows time to gather seeds and determine the proper timing for when particular seeds will be started indoors or sown in the soil.

Recognizing the limitations of a short summer, there still was much joy to be found in working the gardens at Yampatika’s Environmental Learning Center at Legacy Ranch. Food cultivation using sustainable agricultural practices is possibly one of the most rewarding and empowering experiences we can engage with, and in doing so, we have the opportunity to make a positive impact for ourselves, our neighbors and our environment.

One course assignment was to engage the community in the gardening effort.

A weekly community gardening program was offered. I enjoyed making connections, tending the gardens and watching them grow alongside community members, my family and visitors.

When we visit the ranch, my kids can’t wait to see how the vegetables we planted have grown and are incredibly eager to try them, as well.

Program participants took fresh vegetables, new knowledge and valuable experience home to their own gardens. This program will serve as a building block for future programs, and new volunteer participation always is welcome at the ranch.

We have great expectations for these gardens. We currently are harvesting a first round of produce for our local food bank, LIFT-UP of Routt County.

And next year, we will expand the gardens’ capability with improvements that include a permaculture approach to allow for a greater diversity of products grown.

Last year, a partnership between CMC and Yampatika was created where sustainability students participating in the cultural and place-based equity course worked together with CMC culinary students to deliver a beautiful “Garden to Table” event showcasing food from Yampatika’s gardens and from local producers in the Yampa Valley.

The 2014 “Garden-to-Table” event, an annual fundraiser for Yampatika, will be held Oct. 9, and this year’s collaboration is sure to be another memorable event.

Using lessons learned from our “do it yourself” courses and our experiences in the gardens, we plan to make the gardens even better next year and expand our reach into the community.

The gardens at Legacy Ranch have as much potential as our community has heart, and I hope you will join us for future educational and gardening opportunities in the spring.

Megan Walker is a naturalist with Yampatika and a student in Colorado Mountain College’s Sustainability Studies program.

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1000 Words: Colorado Summer

PHoto of Colorado summer wildflowers

Patty Limerick to bring balanced discussion about oil and gas to CMC in Rifle

By Carrie Click

Flyer promoting Patty Limerick talk at CMC RilfeIt’s not easy to pigeonhole Patty Limerick. She’s a tough Western woman and a Yale graduate. She’s known as being energetically funny, and she’s highly educated too, proving that the two aren’t mutually exclusive.

Best of all, Dr. Limerick takes a balanced, academic look at tough issues, helping guide others to more fully understand. The faculty director and chair of the board of the Center of the American West at the University of Colorado, she’s also a professor of history. She exemplifies the quintessentially objective educator ­– so balanced in her approach to controversial issues that it is often difficult to tell where she stands.

And that’s often her point. She lets the facts speak for themselves and respectful dialog shape the discussion.

“We have been longtime admirers of Patty’s work and we decided to see if we could get her to travel to the Western Slope,” said Nancy Genova, campus vice president of Colorado Mountain College in Rifle. “Her work in applying historical perspectives to current issues seemed a good way to guide us in building a Read more